Reinforced Concrete Design Eighth Edition

Reinforced Concrete Design Eighth Edition


The primary objective of Reinforced Concrete Design,
eighth edition, remains the same as that of the previous
editions: to provide a basic understanding of
the strength and behavior of reinforced concrete members
and simple reinforced concrete
structural systems.
With relevant reinforced concrete research and literature
continuing to become available at a rapid rate, it is the
intent of this book to translate this vast amount of information
and data into an integrated source that reflects the latest
information available. It is not intended to be a comprehensive
theoretical
treatise of the subject, because it is believed
that such a document could easily obscure the fundamentals
emphasized in engineering technology and applied engineering
programs. In addition, it is believed that adequate
comprehensive books on reinforced concrete design do exist
for those who seek the theoretical background, the research
studies, and more rigorous applications.
This eighth edition has been prepared


Concrete consists primarily of a mixture of cement and fine
and coarse aggregates (sand, gravel, crushed rock, and/or
other materials) to which water has been added as a necessary
ingredient for the chemical reaction of curing. The bulk
of the mixture consists of the fine and coarse aggregates. The
resulting concrete strength and durability are a function of
the proportions of the mix as well as other factors, such as
the concrete placing, finishing, and curing history.
The compressive strength of concrete is relatively high.
Yet it is a relatively brittle material, the tensile strength of
which is small compared with its compressive strength.
Hence steel reinforcing rods (which have high tensile and
compressive strength) are used in combination with the
concrete; the steel will resist the tension and the concrete the
compression. Reinforced concrete is the result of this combination
of steel and concrete. In many instances, steel and
concrete are positioned in members so that they both resist
compression.

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