Reynolds’s Reinforced Concrete Designer’s Handbook

Reynolds’s Reinforced Concrete Designer’s Handbook


A structure is an assembly of members each of which, under the
action of imposed loads and deformations, is subjected to
bending or direct force (either tensile or compressive), or to a
combination of bending and direct force. These effects may be
accompanied by shearing forces and sometimes by torsion.
Imposed deformations occur as a result of concrete shrinkage
and creep, changes in temperature and differential settlement.
Behaviour of the structure in the event of fire or accidental
damage, resulting from impact or explosion, may need to be
examined. The conditions of exposure to environmental and
chemical attack also need to be considered.


Design includes selecting a suitable form of construction,
determining the effects of imposed loads and deformations,
and providing members of adequate stiffness and resistance.
The members should be arranged so as to combine efficient
load transmission with ease of construction, consistent with
the intended use of the structure and the nature of the site.
Experience and sound judgement are often more important than
precise calculations in achieving safe and economical structures.
Complex mathematics should not be allowed to confuse a sense
of good engineering. The level of accuracy employed in the
calculations should be consistent throughout the design
process, wherever possible.
Structural design is largely controlled by regulations or codes
but, even within such bounds, the designer needs to exercise
judgement in interpreting the requirements rather than designing
to the minimum allowed by the letter of a clause. In the United
Kingdom for many years, the design of reinforced concrete
structures has been based on the recommendations of British
Standards.

LINK

Slab Punching Design Excel Sheet According ACI318-08

Slab Punching Design Excel Sheet According ACI 318-08



Flat slabs that are supported directly on columns, without beams between the columns, generally transfer a significant concentrated load that affects a relatively small area. The critical element of this system is the slab to column connection because of the concentration of shear stress that is generated in the connection zone, and due to the slab punching risk. The term punching shear denotes slab failure in the zone where the concentrated load is applied, or in the support zone (column) due to shear stress.The punching shear strength is an extremely significant parameter for the design of flat slabs, i.e. the slabs supported directly on columns, without beams between columns. Slab punching design models are presented according to ACI Code


LINK

Excel Sheet to Design Deep Beam

Excel Sheet to Design Deep Beam



This Excel Sheet provide the Design of Deep Beam.
Reinforced  concrete  deep  beams  have  many  useful  applications,
particularly  in  tall  buildings,  foundations  and  offshore  structures.
However,  their  design  is  not  covered  adequately  by  national  codes  of
practice: for example the current British Code BS 8110, explicitly states
that  ‘for  design  of  deep  beams,  reference  should  be  made  to  specialist
literature’. The major codes and manuals that contain some discussion of
deep beams include the American ACI Building Code, the draft Eurocode
EC/2,  the  Canadian  Code,  the  CIRIA  Guide  No.  2,  and  Reynolds  and
Steedman's  Reinforced Concrete Designer's Handbook.


LINK

Construction Manager BIM Handbook

Construction Manager BIM Handbook


Building Information Modelling and related technologies are set to transform our industry
beyond recognition.
Within a generation we will have a digitally enabled industry sharing data and information
via the Cloud across all stages of the asset lifecycle – seamlessly, efficiently,
consistently, reliably and creating value for all stakeholders in the process, but most
of all for asset owners and operators – our customers.
You may feel this is a far cry from the current state of affairs in our industry, but
nevertheless this is where we are headed. Many are already on this journey, and more
begin every day. A few years ago, in 2011, the UK Government embarked on a bold
programme – to move our industry towards delivering digital management of assets
in the public sector.


Building Information Modelling 
A phrase that creates fear, generates confusion and misconception, and is
polarising our industry into those that do, those that don’t, perhaps those
that really don’t care, and maybe those that would rather it just all went
away!
For many thinking about starting their BIM journey, the difficulty is knowing
where to start, achieving a basic understanding and then working out how
to move forward.
The aim of The Construction Managers BIM Handbook is to provide some
basic guidance, to cut through themisconceptions and provide CIOB members
and the wider industry with a platform to progress.
This is deliberately intended to be concise, topical and a little basic.
With the help of some distinguished contributors, we will shed some light
on the different aspects of BIM, unpack UK BIM Level 2 and explore what
it means. This isn’t necessarily for the ‘experts’, as I believe those that
are trying to just understand ‘which way is up’ will far outnumber the early
adopters and leading protagonists for several years yet. Our challenge
is to transform an entire industry, dragging it by its bootstraps into the
twenty-first century and beyond.

LINK

Excel Sheet to Design Flat Slab According to Eurocode

Excel Sheet to Design Flat Slab According to Eurocode



Excel Sheet to Design Flat Slab 
 Common practice of design and construction is to support the slabs by beams and support the beams by columns. This may be called as beam-slab construction. The beams reduce the available net clear ceiling height. Hence in warehouses, offices and public halls some times beams are avoided and slabs are directly supported by columns. This types of construction is aesthetically appealing also. These slabs which are directly supported by columns are called Flat Slabs.
This excel sheet pro


LINK

International Construction Contracts

International Construction Contracts


The aim of this Handbook is to provide concise and practical guidance on the
contractual aspects of international construction and engineering projects to
all those involved in negotiating and managing them.
The aim is not to present an academic textbook but to set out clearly and in
straightforward language the main features of construction contracts of which
anyone involved in an international project should be aware.
We illustrate many of these features by reference to the current, well-known
international standard form FIDIC contracts: the contract forms published since
1999 by the Fédération Internationale Des Ingénieurs-Conseils (the International
Federation of Consulting Engineers). Among these FIDIC contracts are two
design-build forms, the Yellow and the Silver Books, and we examine these
systematically in the second part of this Handbook. We focus on them because
design-build contracting, in which the contractor takes responsibility for all or
most of the design, is increasingly the norm in international projects.


This Handbook covers such basic questions as: What is a contract? How is
a contract to be distinguished from the various negotiations taking place

between the parties before the contract is formed? How are the risks of con-
struction typically allocated between the parties to a construction contract?

And what do features of the FIDIC Red and Silver Books, for example, tell us
about risk allocation in different types of project structure? One important
type of structure we look at are concession-type projects.
Disputes and how to resolve them are important features of the management

of any project. If the project goes badly and one or other party suffers some det-
riment, how can that party pursue a claim? How might such a claim be resolved?

We examine mediation, conciliation, litigation and arbitration as well as ’ inter-
mediate ’ processes such as dispute review boards in answering these questions.

LINK

Excel Sheet to Design Light Gage Truss Based on AISI 2001 & ER-4943P

Excel Sheet to Design Light Gage Truss Based on AISI 2001 & ER-4943P



Light gage steel trusses have
been used for 20 or more
years. Truss configurations are similar
to those built of conventional steel
(but with lighter loading) and those
built of wood (with comparable loading).
Light gage steel trusses generally
are used for roof construction,
and as such fit the same niche as light
wood trusses: single family dwellings,
apartment complexes, retirement villages,
small offices, schools and
churches. The trend toward fire resistant
construction in many types of
buildings is currently giving steel an
advantage over wood. The truss usually
is spaced at 16" or 24".
Tkis excel sheet provide the design of Light Gage Truss Based on AISI 2001 & ER-4943P


LINK