Bridge Engineering Seismic Design

Bridge Engineering Seismic Design

The Bridge Engineering Handbook is a unique, comprehensive, and state-of-the-art reference work and
resource book covering the major areas of bridge engineering with the theme “Bridge to the Twenty-First
Century”. It has been written with practicing bridge and structural engineers in mind. The ideal reader
will be an M.S.-level structural and bridge engineer with a need for a single reference source to keep
abreast of new developments and the state of the practice, as well as review standard practices.
The areas of bridge engineering include planning, analysis and design, construction, maintenance, and
rehabilitation. To provide engineers a well-organized and user-friendly, easy-to-follow resource, the
Handbook is divided into and printed in four volumes, I: Superstructure Design, II: Substructure Design,
III: Seismic Design, and IV: Construction and Maintenance.
Volume III: Seismic Design provides the geotechnical earthquake considerations, earthquake damage,
dynamic analysis and nonlinear analysis, design philosophies and performance-based design criteria,
seismic design of concrete and steel bridges, seismic isolation and energy dissipation, active control, soilstructure-
foundation interactions, and seismic retrofit technology and practice.


The Handbook stresses professional applications and practical solutions. Emphasis has been placed on
ready-to-use materials. It contains many formulas and tables that give immediate answers to questions arising
from practical works. It describes the basic concepts and assumptions, omitting the derivations of formulas
and theories. It covers traditional and new, innovative practices. An overview of the structure, organization,
and content of the book can be seen by examining the table of contents presented at the beginning of the
book, while an in-depth view of a particular subject can be seen by examining the individual table of contents
preceding each chapter. References at the end of each chapter can be consulted for more detailed studies.
The chapters have been written by many internationally known authors in different countries covering
bridge engineering practices, research, and development in North America, Europe, and Pacific Rim
countries. This Handbook may provide a glimpse of the rapid global economy trend in recent years toward
international outsourcing of practice and competition of all dimensions of engineering. In general, the
Handbook is aimed toward the needs of practicing engineers, but materials may be reorganized to
accommodate several bridge courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The book may also be
used as a survey of the practice of bridge engineering around the world.

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Estimating Building Costs

Estimating Building Costs

Estimating has taken on a new significance in today’s competitive
construction marketplace. If you consider new technology, the size in both
scope and dollar amounts of today’s construction projects, and the creative
delivery systems employed by today’s construction professionals, estimating
is perhaps the most important function of the successful construction
company. From the time a construction project is proposed, and throughout
its life, the estimate provides information that is critical to its success.
If you are a student of construction or pursuing a career as a construction
professional, you understand the need to create, organize, format, and
deliver an estimate for use in budgeting for a project, developing a plan or
detailed schedule, and managing the project. The estimate is essential to the
execution of all work and for maintaining project control.


Estimating Building Costs, second edition, explains the
fundamentals of the estimating process in a clear and concise format, which
will become an essential part of their work. Experienced estimators will find
the book useful for reviewing their own methods and enhancing their
expertise. Regardless of whether the “estimating staff” is a dedicated person
among a company’s many employees or the same individual who performs
the work, the principles are the same. The text is written in what is referred
to as general knowledge estimating practice, from the point of view of the
general contractor’s estimator, yet it is equally helpful as a foundation for
subcontractors’ estimators. The second edition has been reorganized to
reflect the new CSI MasterFormat 2010TM

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Civil Engineering Reference Manual for the PE Exam

Civil Engineering Reference Manual for the PE Exam

The information that was used to write and update
this book was based on the exam specifications at the
time of publication. However, as with engineering
practice itself, the PE examination is not always based
on the most current codes or cutting-edge technology.
Similarly, codes, standards, and regulations adopted by
state and local agencies often lag issuance by several
years. It is likely that the codes that are most current,
the codes that you use in practice, and the codes that
are the basis of your exam will all be different.
PPI lists on its website the dates and editions of the
codes, standards, and regulations on which NCEES has

announced the PE exams are based. It is your respon-
sibility to find out which codes are relevant to your exam.


If you are a practicing engineer and have obtained this
book as a general reference handbook, it will probably
sit in your bookcase until you have a specific need.
However, if you are preparing for the PE examination in
civil engineering, the following suggestions may help.
. Find out the current edition of this book. You might
be reading this book long after it was published.
Newer editions mean that older editions are no
longer appropriate for the current exam. Newer
editions mean that the codes, standards, and
regulations on which the exam is based are not
represented in the older edition, that the
exam body of knowledge has changed, and/
or the exam format and policies have changed.
New editions are published for a reason, and it’s not
reasonable for you to expect the older edition to
serve your needs when it is out of date.

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Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development

Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development

Project management has come a long way since its modern introduction to construction
projects in the late 1950s. Now, it is an established discipline which executively
manages the full development process, from the client’s idea to funding coordination
and acquirement of planning and statutory controls approval, sustainability, design
delivery, through to the selection and procurement of the project team, construction,
commissioning, handover, review, to facilities management coordination.
This Code of Practice positions the project manager as the client’s representative,
although the responsibilities may vary from project to project; consequently,
project
management may be defined as ‘the overall planning, co-ordination and
control of a project from inception to completion aimed at meeting a client’s
requirements in order to produce a functionally and financially viable project that
will be completed safely, on time, within authorised cost and to the required
quality
standards’.


The fifth edition of this Code of Practice is the authoritative guide and reference to the
principles and practice of project management in construction and development. It
will be of value to clients, project management practices and educational establishments
and students, and to the construction and development industries. Much of
the information contained in the Code of Practice will also be relevant to project
management
practitioners operating in other commercial spheres.

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Repair, Protection and Waterproofing of Concrete Structures

Repair, Protection and Waterproofing of Concrete Structures

Repair methods show somewhat wider differences. For example, in the
US and Canada, cathodic protection has been used for many years before
it was given serious consideration in the UK. The removal of chlorides by
electrochemical means has also been tried in the US, but with mixed success.
In France, considerable use (appreciably more so than in the UK) is made
of special elastomeric coatings to increase the durability of the repaired
areas of concrete, and to reduce greatly the risk of corrosion of reinforcement
in new construction. These coatings are formulated to reduce water
penetration into the concrete and comparatively little attention is given to
the ability of the coating to prevent/reduce diffusion of carbon dioxide

into the concrete.


THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ENGINEER OR OTHER
PROFESSIONALS
An engineer who is instructed to investigate and report on a deteriorated
concrete structure, and to prepare recommendations for necessary remedial
work, should be clear in his own mind on the extent of his responsibilities
to his client.
If he is responsible for the inspection of the remedial work to ensure
that the requirements of the contract are complied with and the certification
of payments-on-account to the contractor, then it is in the interests of his
client that good relations with the contractor are maintained. These ‘good
relations’ will be reflected in the standard of work, and its completion within
the contract period.
The use of proprietary methods of repair can introduce problems in
clearly defining the responsibilities of the engineer.

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Crane Supporting Steel Structure Design Guide

Crane Supporting Steel Structure Design Guide

This guide fills a long-standing need for technical information for the design and construction of crane-supporting
steel structures that is compatible with Canadian codes and standards written in Limit States format. It is intended to
be used in conjunction with the National Building Code of Canada, 2005 (NBCC 2005), and CSAStandard S16-01,
Limit States Design of Steel Structures (S16-01). Previous editions of these documents have not covered many
loading and design issues of crane-supporting steel structures in sufficient detail.
Whilemany references are available as given herein, they do not cover loads and load combinations for limit states
design nor are they well correlated to the class of cranes being supported. Classes of cranes are defined in CSA
Standard B167 or in specifications of the Crane Manufacturers Association of America (CMAA). This guide
provides information on how to apply the current Canadian Codes and Standards to aspects of design of
crane-supporting structures such as loads, load combinations, repeated loads, notional loads, monosymmetrical
sections, analysis for torsion, stepped columns, and distortion induced fatigue.


The purpose of this design guide is twofold:
1. To provide the owner and the designer with a practical set of guidelines, design aids, and references that can be
applied when designing or assessing the condition of crane-supporting steel structures.
2. To provide examples of design of key components of crane-supporting structures in accordance with:
(a) loads and load combinations that have proven to be reliable and are generally accepted by the industry,
(b) the recommendations contained herein, including NBCC 2005 limit states load combinations,
(c) the provisions of the latest edition of S16-01, and,
(d) duty cycle analysis.
The scope of this design guide includes crane-supporting steel structures regardless of the type of crane. The
interaction of the crane and its supporting structure is addressed. The design of the crane itself, including jib cranes,
gantry cranes, ore bridges, and the like, is beyond the scope of this Guide and is covered by specifications such as
those published by the CMAA.

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Advanced Construction Technology 4th Edition

Advanced Construction Technology 4th Edition

Since the previous edition, reprint opportunities have permitted some amendments.
These have included new procedures, relative to legislative and practice changes.
This revised edition develops these further, with greater attention to information
and detail. It also incorporates more recent issues, especially aspects of the Building

Regulations that require buildings to be designed and constructed to higher energy-
efficient standards. The responsibilities on building designers and owners with

regard to human rights are considered in a new chapter outlining the facilities
required for the convenience of the less able using buildings other than dwellings.
Notwithstanding contemporary requirements, the book’s established
construction principles are retained. These provide a useful reference to existing
building stock, and, where appropriate, modifications are included to illustrate
ongoing change.


Advanced Construction Technology is a development of the relatively elementary
construction detailed in the associated volume, Construction Technology. This
volume augments the associated volume with further topics relating to domestic
buildings and lightweight-framed structures, in addition to concentrating primarily
on complex and specialised forms of construction.
It is designed to supplement a student’s lecture notes, projects and research
assignments as well as to provide a valuable professional reference. It also
complements the associated subjects of science, mathematics, materials technology,
design procedures, structural analysis, structural design, services, quantity
surveying, facilities management and management studies, and is therefore
appropriate for most undergraduate and higher-level construction study
programmes.

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