Composite Structures of Steel and Concrete

Composite Structures of Steel and Concrete


This volume provides an introduction to the theory and design of compos-
ite structures of steel and concrete. Readers are assumed to be familiar

with the elastic and plastic theories for the analysis for bending and shear
of cross-sections of beams and columns of a single material, such as
structural steel, and to have some knowledge of reinforced concrete. No
previous knowledge is assumed of the concept of shear connection within
a member composed of concrete and structural steel, nor of the use of
profiled steel sheeting in composite slabs. Shear connection is covered in
depth in Chapter 2 and Appendix A, and the principal types of composite
member in Chapters 3, 4 and 5.


All material of a fundamental nature that is applicable to structures for
both buildings and bridges is included, plus more detailed information
and a fully worked example relating to buildings. The design methods are
illustrated by calculations. For this purpose a single problem, or variations
of it, has been used throughout the volume. The reader will find that the

dimensions for this structure, its loadings, and the strengths of the materi-
als soon remain in the memory. The design is not optimal, because one

object here has been to encounter a wide range of design problems, whereas
in practice one seeks to avoid them.
This volume is intended for undergraduate and graduate students, for
university teachers, and for engineers in professional practice who seek
familiarity with composite structures. Most readers will seek to develop the
skills needed both to design new structures and to predict the behaviour of
existing ones.

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Project Analysis for Business Consulting Firms Company Confidential Template

Project Analysis for Business Consulting Firms Company Confidential Template



Project Analysis for Business Consulting Firms Company Confidential Leads efforts for developers or testing professionals to enhance and create products Full lifecycle project management- including all core aspects required to successfully plan, forecast, manage and execute, reporting to key stakeholders as needed Lead enhancement projects of various levels of complexity in a project manager role, including creation of project schedule and risk management tasks


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Design of Precast Prestressed Composite Beams Excel Sheet

Design of Precast Prestressed Composite Beams Excel Sheet



The precast prestressed concrete units are erected first and can be used to support the formwork needed for the cast in situ slab without additional scaffolding (or shoring). In addition to its contribution to the strength and stiffness of the composite member, the cast in situ slab provides an effective means to distribute loads in the lateral direction. The cast in situ slab can be poured continuously over the supports of precast units placed in series, thus providing continuity to a simple span system.Pre-tensioning in plant is more cost-effective than post-tensioning on site. Because the precast 4 prestressed concrete element is factory-produced and contains the bulk of reinforcement, rigorous quality control and higher mechanical properties can be achieved at relatively low cost. The cast in situ concrete slab does not need to have high mechanical properties and thus is suitable to field conditions.


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BIM Handbook A Guide to Building Information Modeling

BIM Handbook A Guide to Building Information Modeling


The BIM Handbook is addressed to building developers, owners, managers,

and inspectors; to architects, engineers of all disciplines, construction contrac-
tors, and fabricators; and to students of architecture, civil engineering, and

building construction. It reviews Building Information Modeling and its related
technologies, its potential benefi ts, its costs and needed infrastructure. It also
discusses the present and future infl uences of BIM on regulatory agencies; legal
practice associated with the building industry; and manufacturers of building
products—it is directed at readers in these areas. A rich set of BIM case studies
are presented and various BIM tools and technologies are described. Current
and future industry and societal impacts are also explored.


BIM is developing rapidly, and it is diffi cult to keep up with the advances in

both technology and practice. Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is a collabo-
rative contracting paradigm that has been developed and adopted within the

three years since we completed the fi rst edition. BIM tools are increasingly used
to support sustainable design, construction, and operation. There has been
increasing support by BIM for lean design and construction methods which
are highlighted throughout the book. Some innovations we predicted would
become commercial by 2012, such as tracking of building components using
BIM and radio-frequency ID tagging, have already been used in practice.
This edition not only addresses these themes and updates the material related
to the BIM applications; it also introduces sections on new technologies, such as
laser scanning and BIM servers. It also includes six new case studies.

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RC Shear Wall Analysis and Design Excel sheet

RC Shear Wall Analysis and Design Excel sheet 



RC shear wall analysis and design excel sheet easy to use yet innovative construction spreadsheet is used to make the design of shear walls subject to wind and dead load combination. This shear wall design spreadsheet is very useful verifying constancy toward reinforced concrete structure.

 It takes huge time while measuring & then remeasuring wall stiffnesses, direct and torsional rotation component of force to then estimate reinforcement and concrete stresses for a single wall successively. This shear wall design spreadsheet can significantly decrease your design time.

 Presently, the sheet does not support the earlier version of excel like Excel 2003 and so on as these do not make out iferror function.

 This estimating spreadsheet contains the following exclusive characteristics :-

 An apparent and simplified output (all on a single page);
Design Reinforced Concrete walls subject to dead and wind load combination;
Enter highest and least safety factors for Dead Load toward most troublesome load combination;
Identify superstructure and substructure height. Wind load can be assigned to above ground part of structure;
 Identify length of wall ends obstructing tension;
Designs horizontal and vertical reinforcement;
Verify least/highest acceptable reinforcement areas;
'Live' wall diagram;
Design is created on the basis of British Standard


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Guide to Concrete Repair

Guide to Concrete Repair


This guide contains the expertise of numerous individuals who have directly assisted the author on many concrete repair projects or freely shared their concrete repair knowledge whenever requested. Their substantial contributions to the preparation of this guide are acknowledged and appreciated. Some of the material in this guide originated in the various editions of Reclamation’s Concrete Manual. The author edited, revised, or updated this information for inclusion herein.


concrete is a very durable construction material and, if properly proportioned and placed, will give very long service under normal conditions. Many Reclamation concrete structures, however, were constructed using early concrete technology, and they have already provided well over 50 years of service under harsh conditions. Such concrete must be inspected regularly to ensure that it is receiving the maintenance necessary to retain serviceability. Managers and foremen of operation and maintenance crews must understand that, with respect to concrete, there is no such thing as economical deferred maintenance. Failure to promptly provide the proper necessary maintenance will simply result in very expensive repairs or replacement of otherwise useful structures. Figures 1 and 2 demonstrate the folly of inadequate or inappropriate maintenance. These two structures now require replacement at a cost tens of times greater than that of the preventive maintenance that could have extended their serviceability indefinitely.

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Planning and Schedule Free Templates

Planning and Schedule Free Templates



Planning and schedule free templates.Download more than 150 free planning and schedule template. The templates contain Project planner Controls & Planning Management Plan Short Form v4 Controls & Planning Start Up Meeting Excel Time Schedule Template Project team communication plan Project time performance tracking Product or service cost tracker automatic time Schedule and cash flow Small business cash flow projection 12 month cash flow statement Statement of cash flows 12 month profit and loss projection 30 Chart Templates - Excel 2010 Procurement analysis worksheet Project performance tracking and reporting 2005 calendar on multiple worksheets Supplier analysis scorecard Weekly time sheet by client and project Weekly time sheet with tasks and overtime Weekly time sheet with breaks and more templates 


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Analysis of Concrete Slabs on Grade Spradsheet

Analysis of Concrete Slabs on Grade Spradsheet



Analysis of concrete slabs on grade is a spreadsheet program written in MS-Excel for the purpose of analysis of concrete slabs on grade. Specifically, a concrete slab on grade may be subjected to concentrated post or wheel loading. Then for the given parameters, the slab flexural, bearing, and shear stresses are checked, the estimated crack width is determined, the minimum required distribution reinforcing is determined, and the bearing stress on the dowels at construction joints is checked. Also, design charts from the Portland Cement Association (PCA) are included to provide an additional method for determining/checking required slab thickness for flexure. The ability to analyze the capacity of a slab on grade subjected to continuous wall (line-type) load as well as stationary, uniformly distributed live loads is also provided. Loading data for fork trucks and AASHTO trucks is included.


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Prestressed Concrete A Fundamental Approach

Advanced Concrete Technology Processes


ompletely revised to reflect the new ACI 318-08 Building Code and International Building Code, IBC 2009, this popular book offers a unique approach to examining the design of prestressed concrete members in a logical, step-by-step trial and adjustment procedure. Integrates handy flow charts to help readers better understand the steps needed for design and analysis. Includes a revised chapter containing the latest ACI and AASHTO Provisions on the design of post-tensioned beam end anchorage blocks using the strut-and-tie approach in conformity with ACI 318-08 Code. Offers a new complete section with two extensive design examples using the strut-and-tie approach for the design of corbels and deep beams. Features an addition to the elastic method of design, with comprehensive design examples on LRFD and Standard AASHTO designs of bridge deck members for flexure, shear and torsion, conforming to the latest AASHTO specifications. Includes a revised chapter on slender columns, including a simplified load-contour biaxial bending method which is easier to apply in desiign, using moments rather than loads in the reciprocal approach. A useful construction reference for engineers.


This fourth edition revises the previous text . There are 15 chapters covering: (1) introduction (historic development of structural concrete, basic design theory); (2) concrete producing materials; (3) concrete (mix design, tests, properties, quality control, placing and curving); (4) reinforced concrete (general chapter on design and safety); (5) flexure in beams; (6) shear and diagonal tension in beams; (7) torsion; (8) serviceability of beams and one-way slabs; (9) combined compression and bending: columns; (10) bond development of reinforcing bars; (11) design of two-way slabs and plates; (12) footings; (13) continuous reinforced concrete structures; (14) introduction to prestressed concrete; (15) seismic design of concrete structures. The appendices cover: (a) computer programs in Q-Basic; (b) tables and nomograms.

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Pre-Dimensioning of Beams and Columns Excel Sheet

Pre-Dimensioning of Beams and Columns Excel Sheet



Pre-Dimensioning of beams and columns excel sheet conduct a preliminary calculation for centric loaded columns. For columns with bending components and other geometric boundary conditions, please contact our Technical Department.In the case of reinforced concrete, structural elements preliminary design stage has a high importance due to the contribution to the dead loads (the weight of the sectional elements) and to the total mass of the construction. Pre-dimensioning depends on various conditions such as stiffness (admissible deflection), ductility (proper sizing of structural elements so as to create areas with sufficient seismic energy dissipation capacity of deformation in post-elastic domain.


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Advanced Concrete Technology Properties

Advanced Concrete Technology Properties


Fresh concrete is a transient material with continuously changing properties. It is, however,
essential that these are such that the concrete can be handled, transported, placed, compacted

and finished to form a homogenous, usually void-free, solid mass that realizes the full-
potential hardened properties. A wide range of techniques and systems are available for

these processes, and the concrete technologist, producer and user must ensure that the
concrete is suitable for those proposed or favoured.
Fresh concrete technology has advanced at a pace similar to many other aspects of
concrete technology over the past three decades, and indeed many of these advances have
been inter-dependent. For example, the availability of superplasticizers has enabled workable
concrete to be produced at lower water/binder ratios thus increasing the in-situ strength.


In this chapter, we will start by considering the property known as workability*,
including its definition and common methods of measurement. We will point out the
limitations of these, and show how this leads to the need for a more fundamental scientific
description of the behaviour of fresh cement pastes and concrete. We will then describe
how this has been achieved by applying the principles of rheology, and explain the
development and use of test methods which give a more complete understanding of the
behaviour. We will then discuss the effect on the rheological properties of a range of
constituent materials, including admixtures and cement replacement materials, and how
a knowledge of these properties can be used to advantage. The factors that influence the
loss of workability before setting are then briefly considered.

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Capacity Calculations of Structural Members Excel Sheet

Capacity Calculations of Structural Members Excel Sheet



Capacity Calculations of Structural Members Excel Sheet calculate the capacity of different structural members such as beams modules , Columns, Foundations and Slabs.The excel sheet also allow you to design the required reinforcement area and a spacing of reinforcing bars within the cross-section of a concrete structure element. The RC Member Design module allows you to obtain a theoretical (required) area of reinforcement for selected concrete members.


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THE ANALYSIS OF STRESS AND DEFORMATION

THE ANALYSIS OF STRESS AND DEFORMATION


This book was prepared for a course in the mechanics of deformable
bodies at the authors' institution, and is at a level suitable for advanced
undergraduate or first-year graduate students. It differs from the traditional
treatment by going more deeply into the fundamentals and giving less emphasis
to the design aspects of the subject. In the first two chapters the principles
of stress and strain are presented and a sufficient introduction is given to the
theory of elasticity so that the student can see how exact solutions of problems
can be derived, and can appreciate the nature of the approximations embodied
in some commonly used simplified solutions. The third chapter is devoted to
the bending of beams, and the fourth chapter treats the instability of elastic
systems.


Applications to axially symmetric problems, curved beams, and stress
concentrations are discussed in Chapter 5; applications to torsion problems
are discussed in Chapter 6; applications to problems of plates and shells are
discussed in Chapter 7. Applications to problems involving viscous and plastic
behavior are treated in Chapter 8, and problems of wave propagation are
treated in Chapter 9. An introduction to numerical methods of solving
problems is given in Chapter 10. An introduction to tensor notation by means
of the equations of elasticity is given in Appendix I. Experimental methods of
determining stresses by means of strain gages, brittle coatings, and photoelasticity
are described in Appendices I1 and 111. A brief introduction to
variational methods is presented in Appendix IV.

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Project Timeline Excel Sheet

Project Timeline Excel Sheet



Project Timeline Excel Sheet shows you all activities that have happened within the project. It is updated in real time and keeps you in sync with everything happening in the project. It helps you track activities from every user across all the sections of a project in a simple chronological order.


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Computational Methods for Reinforced Concrete Structures

Computational Methods for Reinforced Concrete Structures


“There are no exact answers. Just bad ones, good ones and better ones. Engineering is the
art of approximation.” Approximation is performed with models. We consider a reality of
interest, e.g., a concrete beam. In a first view, it has properties such as dimensions, color,
surface texture. From a view of structural analysis the latter ones are irrelevant. A more
detailed inspection reveals a lot of more properties: composition, weight, strength, stiffness,
temperatures, conductivities, capacities, and so on. From a structural point of view some
of them are essential. We combine those essential properties to form a conceptual model.
Whether a property is essential is obvious for some, but the valuation of others might be
doubtful. We have to choose. By choosing properties our model becomes approximate
compared to reality. Approximations are more or less accurate.
On one hand, we should reduce the number of properties of a model. Any reduction of
properties will make a model less accurate. Nevertheless, it might remain a good model. On
the other hand, an over-reduction of properties will make a model inaccurate and therefore
useless. Maybe also properties are introduced which have no counterparts in the reality of
interest. Conceptual modeling is the art of choosing properties. As all other arts it cannot
be performed guided by strict rules.


A numerical model needs some completion as it has to be described by means of programming
to form a computational model. Finally, programs yield solutions through processing
by computers. The whole cycle is shown in Fig. 1.1. Sometimes it is appropriate to merge
the sophisticated sequence of models into the model.
A final solution provided after computer processing is approximate compared to the
exact solution of the underlying mathematical model. This is caused by discretization and
round-off errors. Let us assume that we can minimize this mathematical approximation
error in some sense and consider the final solution as a model solution. Nevertheless, the
relation between the model solution and the underlying reality of interest is basically an
issue. Both – model and reality of interest – share the same properties by definition or
conceptual modeling, respectively. Let us also assume that the real data of properties can
be objectively determined, e.g., by measurements.

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Excel Sheet to Design RC Column for Axial load According ACI

Excel Sheet to Design RC Column for Axial load According ACI



Design of columns are carried over a group of columns having a low variation of design values. In this group, design is carried for the highest values of axial force, moments about Y and Z directions, shear about Y and Z directions as well as torsion. However, it is a common practice among designers to ignore shear and torsion in columns. This practice will reduce safety factor in columns which are critical structural members responsible for the safety of the structure.


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Concrete Structures Stresses and Deformations

Concrete Structures Stresses and Deformations


Concrete structures must have adequate safety factor against failure and must
also exhibit satisfactory performance in service. This book is concerned with
the checks on stresses and deformations that can be done in design to ensure
satisfactory serviceability of reinforced concrete structures, with or without
prestressing. The following are qualities which are essential for a satisfactory
performance:
1 No excessive deflection should occur under the combined effect of pre-
stressing, the self-weight of the structures and the superimposed dead
load.
2 Deflections and crack width should not be excessive under the above
mentioned loads combined with live and other transitory loads, settle-
ment of support and temperature variations. This makes it necessary to
control stress in the reinforcement, which is one of the main parameters
affecting width of cracks. Durability of concrete structures is closely
linked to the extent of cracking.


Because of creep and shrinkage of concrete and relaxation of prestressed
reinforcement, the stresses in the concrete and in the reinforcement vary with
time. In addition, when the structure is statically indeterminate the reactions
and the internal forces are also time dependent. The strains and consequently
the displacement change considerably with time due to the same effects and
also due to cracking. The purpose of this text is to present the most effective
methods for prediction of the true stresses and deformations during the life
of the structure.
The mechanical properties that enter in calculation of stress and strain are
the modulus of elasticity, creep and shrinkage of concrete and modulus of
elasticity of reinforcements. These properties differ from project to project
and from one country to another.

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Agile Project Plan Excel Sheet

Agile Project Plan Excel Sheet



An agile project plan is based on features. The plan estimates how long it will take for each feature to be delivered, without much detail on how it will be delivered. And because the project plans are focused on features, you can group similar features into sprints. An agile project plan is always changing. Once the plan is developed, the project team needs to maintain it and update status and timelines accordingly. Also known as an agile project schedule, this template lets you add your tasks, who is responsible, start and end dates, and status. The duration for each task will be automatically calculated. This template also features a Gantt chart (a visual representation of your project timeline), which will automatically adjust when you add your own data to the table.


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Concrete Floor System

Concrete Floor System


The main objectives of this publication are to
assist in the selection of the most econom-
ical cast-in-place concrete floor system for
a given plan layout and a given set of loads
Provide a preliminary estimate of material
quantities for the floor system; and
Discuss the effect of different variables in the selection process.
Five different floor systems are considered in
this publication. These are the flat plate, the flat
slab, the one-way joist, the two-way joist or
waffle, and the slab supported on beams on all
four sides. Material quantity estimates are
given for each floor system for various bay
sizes.cost ia because ofi-kc buildings are designed
with more open spaces which in structural terms
means costlier, longer clear spans.


The total cost to construct a building depends on
the use for which the structure is designed, the
availability of qualified contractors, and the part
of the country in which the structure is built.
Figure 1 gives cost comparisons for two differ-
ent types of uses over the past several years.
(The data presented in Figures 1 through 5 and
Table 1 were obtained from Means Concrete
Cost Data, 1990.) ‘Ilte average price per square
foot is considerably greater for office buildings
than for apartment buildings.The majority of the structural cost of a build-
ing typically is the cost of the floor system. This
is particularly true of low-rise buildings and
buildings in low seismic zones. Therefore, it is
imperative to select the most economical floor
system.

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Combined Rectangular Pilecap Design Excel Sheet

Combined Rectangular Pilecap Design Excel Sheet



PILE CAP:- A reinforced concrete slab or block which interconnects a group of piles and acts as a medium to transmit the load from wall or column to the Piles is called a Pile Cap. The Pile cap should normally be rigid so as to distribute the forces equally on the piles of a group. In general it is designed like a footing on soil but with the difference that instead of uniform reaction from the soil, the reactions in this case are concentrated either point loads or distributed.
ASSUMPTIONS INVOLVED IN THE DESIGN OF PILE CAPS:-
 (i) Pile cap is perfectly rigid.
 (ii) Pile heads are hinged to the pile cap and hence no bending moment is transmitted to piles from pile caps. 
(iii) Since the piles are short and elastic columns, the deformations and stress distribution are planer


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Mechanical Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

Mechanical Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete


Self-compacting concrete (SCC) , also known as self-consolidating concrete
, was developed in the late 1980’s, although earlier ‘look-alikes’ surely exist,
though not defined as such. In comparison with conventional concrete, referred to
in this report as vibrated concrete (VC), SCC can be considered on the one hand as
a new type of high-performance material of a different approach to mix design and
rheological characteristics. On the other hand, SCC can be seen as a new approach
to casting concrete enabled by adjusted fresh concrete properties. In reality, SCC is
a combination of both approaches that has enabled to push the boundaries of
concrete technology to a new area.
Several methods exist for the mix design of SCC, as explained in [3]. In various
parts of the world, different concepts might be followed for the proportioning of
SCC and are referred to as ‘powder-type SCC’, ‘VMA-type SCC’, or ‘mixed-type

SCC’.


self-compacting concrete (SCC) has been applied in the
construction industry. In this period, a lot of research has been performed with
regards to the applicability, mix design, pump-ability, durability, rheology, etc. of
SCC. In the nineties, little attention was devoted to the mechanical properties of
the material and to its structural performance. Recently, an increasing amount of
research has been dedicated to these mechanical properties of SCC [1].
Research projects often include data on compressive strength, tensile strength,
and Young’s modulus, although the main focus remained on other aspects of the
concrete as mentioned above. In the past, some authors, e.g. Domone [2] and
Holschmacher [3], have presented surveys on the mechanical properties of SCC
based on available literature. Due to a scarce amount of available test results, these
studies were based on a limited set of data.

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Reinforced Concrete Element Design Spreadsheet

Reinforced Concrete Element Design Spreadsheet



A structure refers to a system of connected parts used to support forces (loads). Buildings,
bridges and towers are examples for structures in civil engineering. In buildings, structure
consists of walls floors, roofs and foundation. In bridges, the structure consists of deck,
supporting systems and foundations. In towers the structure consists of vertical, horizontal and
diagonal members along with foundation.
A structure can be broadly classified as (i) sub structure and (ii) super structure. The portion of
building below ground level is known as sub-structure and portion above the ground is called as
super structure. Foundation is sub structure and plinth, walls, columns, floor slabs with or
without beams, stairs, roof slabs with or without beams etc are super structure.


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CONSTRUCTION COSTS HANDBOOK

CONSTRUCTION COSTS HANDBOOK


Spon’s Asia-Pacific Construction Costs Handbook: 5th Edition pro-
vides overarching construction cost data for 16 countries that include –

Brunei, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia,
Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan,
Thailand and Vietnam
It contains a regional overview of the construction industry in the Asia

Pacific region as well as broad and macroeconomic data on key national indi-
cators, construction output indicators and general construction cost data.

Over the last few years, the global economic outlook has continued to be

shrouded in uncertainty and volatility not least following the financial cri-
sis in the Euro zone. The world economic landscape and tendering climate

have also changed. Updated information is therefore important and even
crucial. While the United States and Europe are going through a difficult
period, investors are turning more keenly to focus on Asia..


This introduction describes the international groupings of the countries,
their key characteristics and various measures of their standard of living.

The section on Construction Output and the Economy relates value of con-
struction output to gross domestic product (GDP) and to levels of invest-
ment for each country. It includes some data on housing stock. Finally there

is a section on the Organisation of the Construction Sector.
The main active regional grouping is the Association of South East Asian

Nations (ASEAN) established in 1967 with the aims of accelerating eco-
nomic growth, social progress and cultural development; the promotion of

collaboration and mutual assistance in matters of common interest; and the
continuing stability of the region.

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Prestressed Post-Tensioned Concrete Section

Prestressed Post-Tensioned Concrete Section



Prestress is defined as a method of applying pre-compression to control the stresses resulting due to external loads below the neutral axis of the beam tension developed due to external load which is more than the permissible limits of the plain concrete. The pre-compression applied (may be axial or eccentric) will induce the compressive stress below the neutral axis or as a whole of the beam c/s. Resulting either no tension or compression.Prestressed concrete is basically concrete in which internal stresses of a suitable magnitude and distribution are introduced so that the stresses resulting from the external loads are counteracted to a desired degree.


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