Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, Fifth Edition

Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, Fifth Edition 

Kenneth M. Leet, Chia-Ming

Preference :

This text introduces engineering and architectural students to the basic techniques required for analyzing the majority of structures and the elements of which most structures are composed, including beams, frames, trusses, arches, and cables. Although the authors assume that readers have completed basic courses in statics and strength of materials, we briefly review the basic techniques from these courses the first time we mention them. To clarify the discussion, we use many carefully chosen examples to illustrate the various analytic techniques introduced, and whenever possible, we select examples confronting engineers in real-life professional practice.

As an engineer or architect involved with the design of buildings, bridges, and other structures, you will be required to make many technical decisions about structural systems. These decisions include (1) selecting an efficient, economical, and attractive structural form; (2) evaluating its safety, that is, its strength and stiffness; and (3) planning its erection under temporary construction loads. To design a structure, you will learn to carry out a structural analysis that establishes the internal forces and deflections at all points produced by the design loads. Designers determine the internal forces in key members in order to size both members and the connections between members. And designers evaluate deflections to ensure a serviceable structure—one that does not deflect or vibrate excessively under load so that its function is impaired.




Content :
  • Introduction
  • Design Loads and Structural Framing
  • Statics of Structures Reactions
  • Trusses
  • Beams and Frames
  • Cables and Arches
  • Deflections of Beams and Frames
  • Work-Energy Methods for Computing Deflections
  • Analysis of Indeterminate Structures by the Flexibility Method
  • Analysis of Indeterminate Beams and Frames by the Slope-Deflection Method
  • Analysis of Indeterminate Beams and Frames by the Moment Distribution
  • Influence Lines for Moving Loads
  • Approximate Analysis of Indeterminate Structures
  • Introduction to the General Stiffness Method
  • Matrix Analysis of Trusses by the Direct Stiffness Method


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Design of Simply Supported Beam with Torsional Loading

Design of Simply Supported Beam with Torsional Loading



This spreadsheet performs a design analysis on a simply supported beam with torsional loading for a W10X54 steel beam (as defined by the AISC Steel Shapes Database). The application follows the design code and equations in AISC



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Steel Beam Design Excel Sheet with Gravity Loading

Steel Beam Design Excel Sheet with Gravity Loading



The Steel Beam module does not permit biaxial loading at the present time, so there are two potential approaches to this loading scheme:
One option is to do two separate Steel Beam runs.  One run would apply the gravity loads to the beam with the beam oriented “web vertical”.  The other run would apply the wind loads to the beam with the beam oriented “web horizontal”.  This would require that the user manually combine the results of the two runs using engineering judgment to come up with a final result.



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Reinforced Flat Slab Design Excel Sheet

Reinforced Flat Slab Design Excel Sheet 



Flat slab system is an important division of concrete floor system. A civil engineer must know all the aspects regarding the flat floor system. Here, we have tried to gather various reading materials available in the web about flat slab floor system in one place. These materials are originally located at different websites. A civil engineer should study these lectures and materials for structural engineering acumen.

A flat slab is a reinforced concrete slab supported directly by concrete columns without the

use of beams. The benefits of using flat slab construction are becoming increasingly recognized. Flat slabs without drops (thickened areas of slab around the columns to resist punching shear) can be built faster because formwork is simplified and minimized, and rapid turn-around can be achieved using a combination of early striking2 and flying systems. The overall speed of construction will then be limited by the rate at which vertical elements can be cast. Flat slab construction places no restrictions on the positioning of horizontal services and partitions and can minimize floor-to-floor heights when there is no requirement for a deep false ceiling. This can have knock-on benefits in terms of lower building height, reduced cladding costs and prefabricated services.

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Concrete Pier (Isolated Deep Foundation) Design Based on ACI 318-14

Concrete Pier (Isolated Deep Foundation) Design Based on ACI 318-14 



Foundation elements are most commonly constructed of reinforced concrete. As compared to the design of concrete elements that form the superstructure of a building, additional consideration must be given to concrete foundation elements due to permanent exposure to potentially deleterious materials, less precise construction tolerances and even the possibility of unintentional mixing with soil.
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Wind Analysis for Shade Open Structure Based on ASCE 7-16

Wind Analysis for Shade Open Structure Based on ASCE 7-16



In order for a structure to be sound and secure, the foundation, roof, and walls must be strong and wind-resistant. When building a structure it is important to calculate wind load to ensure that the structure can withstand high winds, especially if the building is located in an area known for inclement weather. The main wind force resisting system of a building is a vital component. While wind load calculations can be difficult to figure out because the wind is unpredictable, some standard calculations can give you a good idea of what a building can withstand. Wind loading analysis is an essential part of the building process. If wind loading analysis is not done correctly the resulting effects could include collapsed windows and doors, ripped off roofing, and more. Contact Buildings Guide for quotes on safe and durable prefabricated steel buildings.



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Fundamental Structural Analysis

Fundamental Structural Analysis 

w. J. Spencer 

Preference :

Significant changes have occurred in the approach to structural analysis over the last twenty years. These changes have been brought about by a more general understanding of the nature of the problem and the development of the digital computer. Almost all s~ructural engineering offices throughout the world would now have access to some form of digital computer, ranging from hand-held programmable calculators through to the largest machines available. Powerful microcomputers are also widely available and many engineers and students have personal computers as a general aid to their work. Problems in structural analysis have now been formulated in such a way that the solution is available through the use of the computer, largely by what is known as matrix methods of structural analysis. It is interesting to note that such methods do not put forward new theories in structural analysis, rather they are a restatement of classical theory in a manner that can be directly related to the computer. This book begins with the premise that most structural analysis will be done on a computer. This is not to say that a fundamental understanding of structural behaviour is not presented or that only computer-based techniques are given. Indeed, the reverse is true. Understanding structural behaviour is an underlying theme and many solution techniques suitable for hand computation, such as moment distribution, are retained. The most widely used method of computer-based structural analysis is the matrix stiffness method. For this reason, all of the fundamental concepts of structures and structural behaviour are presented against the background of the matrix stiffness method. The result is that the student is naturally introduced to the use of the computer in structural analysis, and neither matrix methods nor the computer are treated as an addendum.

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Content :
  • Introduction to Structural Engineering 
  • Equilibrium Analysis and Determinacy of Structures 
  • Basic Concepts of the Stiffness Method 
  • The Matrix Stiffness Method-Part 1: Beams and Rectangular Frames 
  • The Moment Distribution Method 
  • The Matrix Stiffness Method-Part 2: Coordinate Transformation 
  • The Principle of Virtual Work 
  • The Flexibility Method of Analysis 
  • The Approximate Analysis of Structures
  • Application of Computer Programs to Structural Analysis


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