Pavement and Geotechnical Engineering for Transportation

Pavement and Geotechnical Engineering for Transportation


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Pavement and Geotechnical Engineering for Transportation selects 20 papers that represent the latest developments in the application of soil, rock, and paving materials to the study and application of geomechanics and transportation geotechnology. Many of the selected papers were presented at the 1st International Symposium on Pavement and Geotechnical Engineering for Transportation Infrastructure sponsored by the Nanchang Hangkong University and the International Association of Chinese Infrastructure Professionals (IACIP) in co-operation with ASCE, which occurred from June 5–7, 2011 in Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, China. The papers were selected based on their relevance to the geotechnical and transportation geotechnology. Presented within the Pavement and Geotechnical Engineering for Transportation Geotechnical Practice Publication (GPP) are papers that examine the use of waste in pavement structures, thus attracting one of the many sustainable elements of pavement design. Studies of the pavement structure beginning with the inclusion of chemical additives in soil subgrade, the use of geogrid reinforcement in unpaved and paved roads, to the surface roughness of asphalt mixtures and the freeze-thaw performance of concrete are reported. Also showcased herein are mathematical models that simulate various geotechnical problems. Various soil types are evaluated and discussed for common problems and design inputs used in practice such as slope failure, consolidation, and embankment behavior. An early warning system for subway construction is also exhibited. One or more reviewers along with the editors evaluated each paper published in this ASCE Geotechnical Practice Publication. All published papers are eligible for discussion in the Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering and the Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, and are eligible for ASCE awards. The editors would like to thank Mr. Ken Fishman and the Geo-Institute for their vast assistance with this publication. Due thanks is also given to Ms. Donna Dickert from ASCE publications. Appreciation is given to those who helped assist in the editing duties of this publication. Without their assistance this publication would not be possible.



Content :
  • Structural Performance of Thin Asphalt Pavement Under Accelerated Pavement Testing
  • Performance Measures and Evaluation of Asphalt Pavements Using the Internal Roughness
  • Design of Planar Geosynthetic-Improved Unpaved and Paved Roads
  • Investigation of Moisture Content-Induced Variations in Unbound Aggregates’ Resilient Modulous Through Suction Stress Concept
  • Laboratory Evaluation on the Mechanical Properties of Asphalt Concrete Incorporating Industrial Waste
  • The Relationship Between Freeze-Thaw Resistance and Pore Structure of Concrete
  • Additives for Soil-Cement Stabilization
  • Tube Suction Test for Evaluating Moisture Susceptibility Resulting from Calcium Chloride
  • Critical Load of Subsoil Considering Poisson’s Ratio
  • Heat Transfer Capacity of Heat Exchanger Piles in Soft Clay
  • An Empirical Study on the Estimation of Soil Properties of Loess Ground After Dynamic Compaction
  • Settlement Analysis of Embedded Foundation Resting on Elastic Soil 


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Staircases Structural Analysis and Design

Staircases Structural Analysis and Design

 M.Y.H. Bangash

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Staircases is divided into five chapters: Specifications and basic data on staircases; Structural analysis of staircases – Classical methods; Structural analysis of staircases – Modern methods; Staircases and their analysis – A comparative study; Design analysis and structural detailing. Charts and graphs are included and numerous design examples are given of freestanding and other geometric staircases and of their elements and components. These examples are related to the case studies which were based on staircases that have already been constructed. All examples are checked using various Eurocodes.

The book includes bibliographical references and is supported by two appendices, which will be of particular interest to those practising engineers who wish to make a comparative study of the different practices and code requirements used by various countries; detailed drawings are included from the USA, Britain, Europe and Asia. Staircases will serve as a useful text for teachers preparing design syllabi for undergraduate and post graduate courses. Each major section contains a full explanation which allows the book to be used by students and practising engineers, particularly those facing the formidable task of having to design/ detail complicated staircases with unusual boundary conditions. Contractors will also find this book useful in the preparation of construction drawings and manufacturers will be interested in the guidance given in the text.



Content :
  • Specification and basic data on staircases
  • Structural analysis of staircases classical methods 
  • Structural analysis of staircases modern methods 
  • Staircases and their analysis a comparative study 
  • Design analysis and structural detailing 


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Structural Analysis Fourth Edition

Structural Analysis Fourth Edition, SI


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Structural analysis is the prediction of the performance of a given structure under prescribed loads and/or other external e¤ects, such as support movements and temperature changes. The performance characteristics commonly of interest in the design of structures are (1) stresses or stress resultants, such as axial forces, shear forces, and bending moments; (2) deflections; and (3) support reactions. Thus, the analysis of a structure usually involves the determination of these quantities as caused by a given loading condition. The objective of this text is to present the methods for the analysis of structures in static equilibrium. This chapter provides a general introduction to the subject of structural analysis. We first give a brief historical background, including the names of people whose work is important in the field. Then we discuss the role of structural analysis in structural engineering projects. We describe the five common types of structures: tension and compression structures, trusses, and shear and bending structures. Finally, we consider the development of the simplified models of real structures for the purpose of analysis.

Since the dawn of history, structural engineering has been an essential part of human endeavor. However, it was not until about the middle of the seventeenth century that engineers began applying the knowledge of mechanics (mathematics and science) in designing structures. Earlier engineering structures were designed by trial and error and by using rules of thumb based on past experience. The fact that some of the magnificent structures from earlier eras, such as Egyptian pyramids (about 3000 b.c.), Greek temples (500–200 b.c.), Roman coliseums and aqueducts (200 b.c.–a.d. 200), and Gothic cathedrals (a.d. 1000–1500), still stand today is a testimonial to the ingenuity of their builders



Content :
  • Introduction to Structural Analysis
  • Loads on Structures
  • Equilibrium and Support Reactions
  • Plane and Space Trusses
  • Beams and Frames: Shear and Bending Moment
  • Deflections of Beams: Geometric Methods
  • Deflections of Trusses, Beams, and Frames: Work–Energy Methods
  • Influence Lines
  • Slope-Deflection Method
  • Moment-Distribution Method
  • Introduction to Matrix Structural Analysis


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Concrete Folded Plate Roofs

Concrete Folded Plate Roofs

C B Wilby

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Folded plates have been used on various buildings, for instance storage buildings, swimming
pools, gymnasia, offices, centres, entrances to buildings and tunnels - for examples see Plates
1-18. Sometimes industrialists like to have the facility to hang unpredicted miscellaneous light
loads from anywhere under a roof and regard the structural steelwork as inherently providing this
facility. Because of this requirement the author designed the shells shown in Plate 10 to have a
network of numerous cadmium-plated steel bolts placed through holes in the shells and through
steel anchorage plates of 152 mm (6 in) square on the top surface of the shells. Each bolt protruded
out of the soffit of the shell so that just about anything could be screwed on to it at some
future date. The nuts and plates were covered with a 50 mm (2 in) layer of vermiculite insulation
on the top of the shell, waterproofed with three layers of built-up roofing felt. This facility can
similarly be applied to the plates of folded plate roofs.
Because they are of concrete, such roofs have inherent resistance to fire, deterioration and to
atmospheric corrosion. They allow large spans to be achieved in structural concrete. This allows
flexibility of planning and mobility beneath. Where ground conditions require expensive piled
foundations the reduced number of supporting columns can be an economic advantage. For large
spans in structural concrete folded plates compete with barrel vault roofs. The plates are required
to be thicker than the shells, and there are more firms who will tackle constructing them without
excessive prices, increasing competition and sometimes making the cost more competitive than
for cylindrical shells.



Content :
  • Practicalities
  • Analysis used for the design tables
  • Factors used in the design tables
  • Construction
  • Appendices: Design tables for concrete folded plate roofs


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Quality in the Constructed Project a Guide for Owners, Designers and Constructors

Quality in the Constructed Project a Guide for Owners, Designers and Constructors


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The purpose of this Guide is to provide project owners, design professionals, and constructors with information and recommendations on opportunities to enhance the quality of constructed projects. While written for these three traditional project participants, this Guide is also intended to be useful to others who are involved in project design and construction, including subcontractors, vendors, operations and maintenance personnel, inspectors, and project users. Additionally, the information in this Guide may be of value to government officials, educators, students, legal professionals, and general readers with an interest in design and construction. Given its broad intended use, this Guide is an “aspirational” document with the goals of educating and stimulating users to identify areas where they may raise the quality level of their practice. This document is not a technical standard, nor a compilation of standard industry practices. Users should not infer that simply following the practices discussed herein will automatically result in improved project quality. Many other factors, some beyond the control of the project team, can affect project outcomes. Project participants are therefore encouraged to modify or vary the processes described in this Guide to achieve the desired quality results for specific projects.



Content :
  • INTRODUCTION
  • THE OWNER’S ROLE AND REQUIREMENTS
  • PROJECT DELIVERY SYSTEMS
  • THE PROJECT TEAM
  • COORDINATION AND COMMUNICATION
  • SELECTING THE DESIGN PROFESSIONAL
  • AGREEMENT FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
  • ALTERNATIVE STUDIES AND PROJECT IMPACTS
  • PLANNING AND MANAGING DESIGN
  • DESIGN DISCIPLINE COORDINATION
  • GUIDELINES FOR DESIGN ACTIVITIES
  • PRE-CONTRACT PLANNING FOR CONSTRUCTION


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Managing the Building Design Process

Managing the Building Design Process

Gavin Tunstall

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There can be little doubt that towards the latter part of the twentieth century, the creation of
many new buildings in the UK had become an excessively confrontational process, encouraging
clients, designers and builders to seek to gain advantages from one another rather than to
work constructively together. Strict adherence to ‘professional’ roles and an unwillingness to
step over historically defined boundaries discouraged co-operation and collaboration.
Blinkered by contracts, time scales and costs, the process often appeared to be cramped in an
over-demanding, claims-conscious environment, fixated by narrow aims and responsibilities,
seemingly unable or unwilling to reflect a genuine concern with quality or customer care. The
Latham and Egan Reports, published in the 1990s described this situation as wasteful and very
significantly, that it was contributing to a diminution in the quality of both design and construction.
The reports laid the foundations for substantial on-going changes in practice and guidance
developed during the past 10 years.

The process of designing and constructing new buildings is a complex activity reflecting the
skills, perceptions and expectations of many individuals, who must attempt to respond to technical
and philosophical challenges, resolve debates and deal with the inevitable conflicts associated
with working together. The associated personnel difficulties and contractual obligations
cannot be dismissed lightly, but in an ideal scenario, everyone should be capable of appreciating
how and why decisions are taken so that there is a better chance of achieving the best possible
results under the prevailing circumstances. Understanding the process of building design
in terms of what should be done rather than who should do it helps to minimise the negative
restraints of professional boundaries. This book is based on my experience as an architect, but
I use the term building designer to describe the process of design and construction of an imaginary
new building offering a broad stage-by-stage explanation of the way in which ideas can
become reality. Although reference to some technical issues is inevitably based on current UK
practice, for the most part my intension is to discuss general principles, which I believe to be
universally applicable.



Content :
  • Design and the designers
  • Communication
  • Permissions and approvals
  • Inception
  • Design planning
  • The design brief
  • The Design: Function, Part 1 How buildings are used
  • The Design: Function, Part 2 Design and construction constraints
  • The design: aesthetics
  • Construction information
  • Pre-contract administration
  • Construction supervision


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Design of Structural Steelwork Second Edition

Design of Structural Steelwork Second Edition



Preference :

Instruction in structural design has always been considered an essential part of the training of a student engineer, though the difficulties of teaching the subject effectively have not always been completely appreciated. An ideal course should combine theoretical instruction and practical application; limitations of time, space and money generally restrict the latter aspect to calculation and drawing with perhaps the construction and testing of models. But much can be done with pencil and paper to inculcate a sound approach to the design of structures, provided the student is made aware of the fundamentals of design method and the specific problems associated with the various structural materials. The aim of this publication is to present the essential design aspects of one structural material—steel. The book is of an entirely introductory nature, demanding no prior knowledge of the subject, but readers are assumed to have followed (or be following) courses in structural analysis and mechanics of materials in sufficient depth to give them a confident grasp of elementary structural and stress analysis techniques. Although it has been written primarily with undergraduates in mind the book will be of use to young graduates who may be coming across the subject for the first time. For this reason, the example calculations conform as far as possible to practical requirements.

The first chapter commences with a brief review of the historical development of the science of iron and steel making and the use of these two materials in structures, followed by a discussion of the important properties of structural steel, and the types of steel products available for structural use. Design philosophy and stability, outlined in Chapter 2, are followed by a detailed chapter on that most important structural element, the beam. After consideration of local and overall instability the chapter goes on to describe the design of a number of different beam types; rolled sections, compound beams, welded plate girders, gantry girders and composite beams. Chapter 4 is devoted to elements loaded in tension or compression, with or without bending, considering rolled and built-up members, concrete encasement and concrete filling, and the special problems of angle members. Connections are the subject of Chapter 5. Detailed treatment of the fundamentals of connection design is given, with emphasis on highway



Content :
  • Iron and steel
  • Design and stability
  • Beams
  • Axially loaded elements
  • Steelwork connections
  • Design of element assemblies


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