Steel Beam Design Excel Sheet with Gravity Loading

Steel Beam Design Excel Sheet with Gravity Loading



The Steel Beam module does not permit biaxial loading at the present time, so there are two potential approaches to this loading scheme:
One option is to do two separate Steel Beam runs.  One run would apply the gravity loads to the beam with the beam oriented “web vertical”.  The other run would apply the wind loads to the beam with the beam oriented “web horizontal”.  This would require that the user manually combine the results of the two runs using engineering judgment to come up with a final result.



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Reinforced Flat Slab Design Excel Sheet

Reinforced Flat Slab Design Excel Sheet 



Flat slab system is an important division of concrete floor system. A civil engineer must know all the aspects regarding the flat floor system. Here, we have tried to gather various reading materials available in the web about flat slab floor system in one place. These materials are originally located at different websites. A civil engineer should study these lectures and materials for structural engineering acumen.

A flat slab is a reinforced concrete slab supported directly by concrete columns without the

use of beams. The benefits of using flat slab construction are becoming increasingly recognized. Flat slabs without drops (thickened areas of slab around the columns to resist punching shear) can be built faster because formwork is simplified and minimized, and rapid turn-around can be achieved using a combination of early striking2 and flying systems. The overall speed of construction will then be limited by the rate at which vertical elements can be cast. Flat slab construction places no restrictions on the positioning of horizontal services and partitions and can minimize floor-to-floor heights when there is no requirement for a deep false ceiling. This can have knock-on benefits in terms of lower building height, reduced cladding costs and prefabricated services.

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Concrete Pier (Isolated Deep Foundation) Design Based on ACI 318-14

Concrete Pier (Isolated Deep Foundation) Design Based on ACI 318-14 



Foundation elements are most commonly constructed of reinforced concrete. As compared to the design of concrete elements that form the superstructure of a building, additional consideration must be given to concrete foundation elements due to permanent exposure to potentially deleterious materials, less precise construction tolerances and even the possibility of unintentional mixing with soil.
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Wind Analysis for Shade Open Structure Based on ASCE 7-16

Wind Analysis for Shade Open Structure Based on ASCE 7-16



In order for a structure to be sound and secure, the foundation, roof, and walls must be strong and wind-resistant. When building a structure it is important to calculate wind load to ensure that the structure can withstand high winds, especially if the building is located in an area known for inclement weather. The main wind force resisting system of a building is a vital component. While wind load calculations can be difficult to figure out because the wind is unpredictable, some standard calculations can give you a good idea of what a building can withstand. Wind loading analysis is an essential part of the building process. If wind loading analysis is not done correctly the resulting effects could include collapsed windows and doors, ripped off roofing, and more. Contact Buildings Guide for quotes on safe and durable prefabricated steel buildings.



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Fundamental Structural Analysis

Fundamental Structural Analysis 

w. J. Spencer 

Preference :

Significant changes have occurred in the approach to structural analysis over the last twenty years. These changes have been brought about by a more general understanding of the nature of the problem and the development of the digital computer. Almost all s~ructural engineering offices throughout the world would now have access to some form of digital computer, ranging from hand-held programmable calculators through to the largest machines available. Powerful microcomputers are also widely available and many engineers and students have personal computers as a general aid to their work. Problems in structural analysis have now been formulated in such a way that the solution is available through the use of the computer, largely by what is known as matrix methods of structural analysis. It is interesting to note that such methods do not put forward new theories in structural analysis, rather they are a restatement of classical theory in a manner that can be directly related to the computer. This book begins with the premise that most structural analysis will be done on a computer. This is not to say that a fundamental understanding of structural behaviour is not presented or that only computer-based techniques are given. Indeed, the reverse is true. Understanding structural behaviour is an underlying theme and many solution techniques suitable for hand computation, such as moment distribution, are retained. The most widely used method of computer-based structural analysis is the matrix stiffness method. For this reason, all of the fundamental concepts of structures and structural behaviour are presented against the background of the matrix stiffness method. The result is that the student is naturally introduced to the use of the computer in structural analysis, and neither matrix methods nor the computer are treated as an addendum.

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Content :
  • Introduction to Structural Engineering 
  • Equilibrium Analysis and Determinacy of Structures 
  • Basic Concepts of the Stiffness Method 
  • The Matrix Stiffness Method-Part 1: Beams and Rectangular Frames 
  • The Moment Distribution Method 
  • The Matrix Stiffness Method-Part 2: Coordinate Transformation 
  • The Principle of Virtual Work 
  • The Flexibility Method of Analysis 
  • The Approximate Analysis of Structures
  • Application of Computer Programs to Structural Analysis


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Water Retaining Structures Analysis and Design

Water Retaining Structures Analysis and Design



Estimating labour requirements is one of the most important parts of estimating and costing the cost of labour. It is often more than half the cost of a job. An error in this area can be very costly to the workplace.
Labour costs depend on the time it will take to manufacture an item. To work this out, it helps to break the job down into the different steps required and then estimate the time it would take someone to complete each step.



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HYDRAULICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

HYDRAULICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Andrew Chadwick, John Morfett

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The aim of the fifth edition of Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering remains to be
to provide comprehensive coverage of civil engineering hydraulics in all its aspects and to provide
an introduction to the principles of environmentally sound hydraulic engineering practice.
To those who would be reading this book for the first time, we hope you enjoy it. You should
find sufficient material to cover most first degree courses and useful information for a higher
degree and for professional practice. The references and further reading lists are comprehensive
and point the way to further study.
The fifth edition has been extensively reviewed by a panel of ten experts drawn from across
the world. It contains much of the material from the previous editions and includes substantive
revisions of the chapters on hydraulic machines, flood hydrology and computational modeling.
New material has also been added to the chapters on hydrostatics, principles of fluid flow, the behavior of real fluids, open channel flow, pressure surge in pipelines, wave theory, sediment
transport, river engineering, and coastal engineering. The latest recommendations regarding
climate change predictions, impacts and adaptation measures have also been included. The
chapter on water quality modeling has been removed to contain the size of the book. References
have been updated throughout.

Hydraulics is a very ancient science. The Egyptians and Babylonians constructed canals, both
for irrigation and for defensive purposes. No attempts were made at that time to understand
the laws of fluid motion. The first notable attempts to rationalize the nature of pressure and
flow patterns were undertaken by the Greeks. The laws of hydrostatics and buoyancy were
enunciated; Ctesibius and Hero designed hydraulic equipment such as the piston pump and
water clock and, of course, there was the Archimedes screw pump. The Romans appear, like the
Egyptians, to have been more interested in the practical and constructional aspects of hydraulics
than in theorizing. Thus, development continued slowly until the time of the Renaissance,
when men such as Leonardo Da Vinci began to publish the results of their observations. Ideas
which emerged then, respecting conservation of mass (continuity of flow), frictional resistance
and the velocity of surface waves, are still in use, though sometimes in a more refined form.
The Italian School became famous for their work. Torricelli et al. observed the behavior of
water jets. They compared the path traced by a free jet with projectile theory and related the
jet velocity to the square root of the pressure generating the flow. Guglielmini et al. published
the results of observations on river flows. The Italians were hydraulicians in the original sense
of the word, i.e., they were primarily empiricists. Up to this point, mathematics had played
no significant part in this sort of scientific work. Indeed, at that time mathematics was largely
confined to the principles of geometry, but this was about to change.



Content :
  • 1 Hydrostatics
  • 2 Principles of Fluid Flow
  • 3 Behaviour of Real Fluids
  • 4 Flow in Pipes and Closed Conduits
  • 5 Open Channel Flow
  • 6 Pressure Surge in Pipelines
  • 7 Hydraulic Machines
  • 12 Pipeline Systems
  • 13 Hydraulic Structures
  • 14 Computational Hydraulics
  • 15 River and Canal Engineering
  • 16 Coastal Engineering
  • 17 Postscript


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