Industrial Communication Technology Handbook, Second Edition

Industrial Communication Technology Handbook, Second Edition

Richard Zurawski

Preference :

The first edition of the Industrial Communication Technology Handbook was published almost a decade
ago, in 2005. It gave a fairly comprehensive picture of the specialized communication networks used in
diverse application areas. Solutions and technologies proposed for and deployed in process automation
and on the factory floor dominated the volume. Not surprisingly, the late 1980s and the 1990s were
the years when a large number of frequently competing solutions and technologies were introduced by
major automation vendors and industry consortia. At the end of the 1990s, the Ethernet emerged as a
contender for real-time applications, including safety-critical ones—largely on the factory floor. The
Ethernet was also viewed as a potential solution for the vertical integration of functional layers of the
industrial automation architectures, as it enabled a seamless data/command flow between the factory
floor and upper layers. Another emerging area of research and development embarked upon at that time
by the control and automation industry sector was the use of commercial wireless technologies in the
automation of plants and on the factory floor.
But plant and factory automation were not the only application areas for specialized communication
networks. The automotive industry has been exploring from the mid-1980s the possibility of the use of
dedicated networks to automate different car functions and domains, aiming to replace mechanical or
hydraulic systems with electrical/electronic ones. Production models released from the beginning of the
1990s integrated a range of networks to support different car functions and domains.
Building automation and control (BAC) is aimed at reducing energy consumption. As early as the
mid-1990s, research and development activities commenced in Japan and in the United States to come
up with a system to control light and temperature (coupled, particularly close to window areas) in
office buildings to save energy and provide “personal comfort.” Due to the highly distributed nature of
the systems involved, using specialized communication networks was a necessity.
The use of specialized communication networks in avionics was a world of its own. At the time when
the first edition was published, any technical publications were seldom available to the broad engineering
profession. Most technical details were confined to technical reports, sometimes available for a
substantial fee.

Download Industrial Communication Technology Handbook, Second Edition



Content :
  • Field Area and Control Networks
  • Industrial Ethernet
  • Fault-Tolerant Clock Synchronization in Industrial Automation Networks
  • Accessing Factory Floor Data
  • Safety Technologies in Industrial Networks and Network Security
  • Wireless Industrial Networks
  • Time-Triggered Communication
  • Avionics and Aerospace
  • Automotive Communication Technologies
  • Building Automation
  • Energy and Power Systems
  • Communication Networks and Services in Railway Applications
  • Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International
  • Emerging Protocols and Technologies


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Handbook of Heat Transfer

Handbook of Heat Transfer

Warren Rohsenow, James Hartnett

Preference :

Heat is defined as energy transferred by virtue of a temperature difference. It flows from
regions of higher temperature to regions of lower temperature. It is customary to refer to different
types of heat transfer mechanisms as modes. The basic modes of heat transfer are conduction,
radiation, and convection.
Conduction is the transfer of heat from one part of a body at a higher temperature to another
part of the same body at a lower temperature, or from one body at a higher temperature to
another body in physical contact with it at a lower temperature. The conduction process takes
place at the molecular level and involves the transfer of energy from the more energetic
molecules to those with a lower energy level. This can be easily visualized within gases, where
we note that the average kinetic energy of molecules in the higher-temperature regions is
greater than that of those in the lower-temperature regions. The more energetic molecules,
being in constant and random motion, periodically collide with molecules of a lower energy
level and exchange energy and momentum. In this manner there is a continuous transport
of energy from the high-temperature regions to those of lower temperature. In liquids the
molecules are more closely spaced than in gases, but the molecular energy exchange process
is qualitatively similar to that in gases. In solids that are nonconductors of electricity (dielectrics),
heat is conducted by lattice waves caused by atomic motion. In solids that are good conductors of electricity, this lattice vibration mechanism is only a small contribution to the
energy transfer process, the principal contribution being that due to the motion of free electrons,
which move in a similar way to molecules in a gas.

Handbook of Heat Transfer


Content :
  • Basic Concepts of Heat Transfer
  • Thermophysical Properties
  • Conduction and Thermal Contact Resistances
  • Natural Convection
  • Forced Convection, Internal Flow in Ducts
  • Forced Convection, External Flows
  • Radiation
  • Microscale Transport Phenomena
  • Heat Transfer in Porous Media
  • Nonnewtonian Fluids
  • Techniques to Enhance Heat Transfer
  • Heat Pipes
  • Heat Transfer in Packed and Fluidized Beds
  • Condensation


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HIGHWAY ENGINEERING

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING

Smid Book

Preference :

Given the problems of congestion in built-up urban areas, maximising the efficiency with which highways are planned, analysed, designed and maintained is of particular concern to civil engineering practitioners and theoreticians. This book is designed as an introductory text which will deliver basic information in those core areas of highway engineering of central importance to practising highway engineers.
Highway Engineering is intended as a text for undergraduate students on degree and diploma courses in civil engineering. It does, however, touch on topics which may be of interest to surveyors and transport planners. The book does not see itself as a substitute for courses in these subject areas, rather it demonstrates their relevance to highway engineering. The book must be focused on its primary readership – first and foremost it must provide an essential text for those wishing to work in the area, covering all the necessary basic foundation material needed for practitioners at the entry
level to industry. In order to maximise its effectiveness, however, it must also address the requirements of additional categories of student: those wishing to familiarise themselves with the area but intending to pursue another speciality after graduation and graduate students requiring necessary theoretical detail in certain crucial areas.
The aim of the text is to cover the basic theory and practice in sufficient depth to promote basic understanding while also ensuring as wide a coverage as possible of all topics deemed essential to students and trainee practitioners. The text seeks to place the topic in context by introducing the economic, political, social and administrative dimensions of the subject. In line with its main task,
it covers central topics such as geometric, junction and pavement design while ensuring an adequate grasp of theoretical concepts such as traffic analysis and economic appraisal.
The book pays frequent reference to the Department of Transport’s Design Manual for Roads and Bridges and moves in a logical sequence from the planning and economic justification for a highway, through the geometric design and traffic analysis of highway links and intersections, to the design and maintenance of both flexible and rigid pavements. To date, texts have concentrated on either
highway planning/analysis or on the pavement design and maintenance aspects of highway engineering. As a result, they tend to be advanced in nature rather than introductory texts for the student entering the field of study for the first time.


HIGHWAY ENGINEERING


Content :
  • The Transportation Planning Process
  • Forecasting Future Traffic Flows
  • Scheme Appraisal for Highway Projects
  • Basic Elements of Highway Traffic Analysis
  • The Design of Highway Intersections
  • Geometric Alignment and Design
  • Highway Pavement Materials and Design
  • Structural Design of Pavement Thickness
  • Pavement Maintenance


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Facility Piping Systems Handbook for Industrial, Commercial and Healthcare Facilities

Facility Piping Systems Handbook for Industrial, Commercial and Healthcare Facilities

Michael Frankel

Preference :

The purpose of this handbook is to provide engineers, students, and others with principles and concepts that will enable them to solve design problems and calculation procedures that are an everyday part of the design for various systems. This handbook reflects the changing code requirements that are a part of the engineering industry. The third edition enables me to continue this idea and enhance the handbook’s reference value.
There have been some major new developments since the publication of the second edition that has made this third edition necessary. New material for swimming pools has been added since this has become part of many client requests for consulting engineers. The chapters for health care facilities have been revised based on the latest edition of NFPA-99, Code for Health Care Facilities, and improved design procedures. The plumbing section has been updated due to the revision of various plumbing codes. Illustrative examples, including step-by-step procedures, have been modernized and enlarged. Most chapters have been updated, mostly due to revised code requirements, but, also, many of the calculations

Facility Piping Systems Handbook for Industrial, Commercial and Healthcare Facilities


Content :
  • Codes and Standards
  • Piping
  • Solid-Liquid Separation and Interceptors
  • Water Treatment and Purification
  • Heat Transfer, Insulation, and Freeze Protection
  • Site Utility Systems
  • Turf Irrigation Systems
  • Cryogenic Storage Systems
  • Plumbing Systems
  • Special Waste Drainage Systems
  • Swimming Pools, Spas, and Water Attractions
  • Liquid Fuel Storage and Dispensing Systems
  • Fuel Gas Systems
  • Compressed Gas Systems
  • Vacuum Air Systems


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Satellite Communications Systems: Systems, Techniques and Technology

Satellite Communications Systems: Systems, Techniques and Technology

Gerard Maral, Michel Bousquet

Preference :

Satellite communications are the outcome of research in the area of communications and space
technologies whose objective is to achieve ever increasing ranges and capacities with the lowest
possible costs.
The Second World War stimulated the expansion of two very distinct technologies—missiles
and microwaves. The expertise eventually gained in the combined use of these two techniques
opened up the era of satellite communications. The service provided in this way usefully
complements that previously provided exclusively by terrestrial networks using radio and cables.
The space era started in 1957 with the launching of the first artificial satellite (Sputnik).
Subsequent years have been marked by various experiments including the following: Christmas
greetings from President Eisenhower broadcast by SCORE (1958), the reflecting satellite ECHO
(1960), store-and-forward transmission by the COURIER satellite (1960), powered relay satellites
(TELSTAR and RELAY in 1962) and the first geostationary satellite SYNCOM (1963).
In 1965, the first commercial geostationary satellite INTELSAT I (or Early Bird) inaugurated
the long series of INTELSATs; in the same year, the first Soviet communications satellite of the
MOLNYA series was launched.

The first satellites provided a low capacity at a relatively high cost; for example, INTELSAT I
weighed 68 kg at launch for a capacity of 480 telephone channels and an annual cost of $32 500 per
channel at the time. This cost resulted from a combination of the cost of the launcher, that of the
satellite, the short lifetime of the satellite (1.5 years) and its low capacity. The reduction in cost is
the result of much effort which has led to the production of reliable launchers which can put
heavier and heavier satellites into orbit (typically 5900 kg at launch in 1975, reaching 10 500 kg by
Ariane 5 ECA and 13 000 kg by Delta IV in 2008). In addition, increasing expertise in microwave
techniques has enabled realisation of contoured multibeam antennas whose beams adapt to the
shape of continents, frequency re-use from one beam to the other and incorporation of higher power transmission amplifiers. Increased satellite capacity has led to a reduced cost per telephone
channel.


Satellite Communications Systems: Systems, Techniques and Technology


Content :
  • Introduction
  • Orbits and Related Issues
  • Baseband Signals and Quality of Service
  • Digital Communications Techniques
  • Uplink, Downlink and Overall Link Performance; Intersatellite Links
  • Multiple Access
  • Satellite Networks
  • Earth Stations
  • The Communication Payload
  • The Platform
  • Satellite Installation and Launch Vehicles
  • The Space Environment
  • Reliability of Satellite Communications Systems


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Building Services Handbook Fourth Edition

Building Services Handbook Fourth Edition

Fred Hall, Roger Greeno

Preference :

The capital and installation costs of building services in modern buildings can take up 50% of the total construction budget. For highly serviced buildings such as sports centres, this figure can easily exceed 75%. Services can also take up 15% of a building’s volume. Therefore building services
cannot be ignored. Architects have learnt to accept and accommodate the increased need for pipes, ducts and cabling encroaching on to their designs.
Some with reluctance, not least Louis Kahn when writing in World Architecture in 1964: ‘I do not like ducts, I do not like pipes. I hate them so thoroughly, I feel that they have to be given their place. If I just hated them and took no care, I think they would invade the building and completely destroy it.’ Not all architects have chosen to compete with the ducting and mechanical plant. Some have followed the examples of Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers by integrating it with the construction and
making it a feature of the building, viz. the Pompidou Centre in Paris and the Lloyds Building in London. Building services are the dynamics in a static structure, providing movement, communications, facilities and comfort. As they are unavoidable, it is imperative that architects, surveyors, builders, structural engineers, planners, estate managers and all those concerned with the construction of buildings have a knowledge and appreciation of the subject.

This book incorporates a wide range of building services. It provides a convenient reference for all construction industry personnel. It is an essential reference for the craftsman, technician, construction site manager, facilities manager and building designer. For students of building crafts,
national certificates and diplomas, undergraduates and professional examinations, this book will substantiate study notes and be an important supplement to lectures. The services included in this book are cold and hot water supplies, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, drainage, sanitation, refuse and sewage disposal, gas, electricity, oil installation, fire services, transportation,
accommodation for services, energy recovery and alternative energy. The emphasis throughout is economic use of text with a high proportion of illustrations to show the principles of installation in a comprehensive manner. Where appropriate, subjects are supplemented with references for further reading into legislative and national standards. Most topics have design applications with charts and formulae to calculate plant and equipment ratings or sizes.
Building Services Handbook Fourth Edition


Content :
  • Part One Cold Water and Supply Systems
  • Part Two Hot Water Supply Systems
  • Part Three Heating Systems
  • Part Four Fuel Characteristics and Storage
  • Part Five Ventilation Systems
  • Part Six Air Conditioning
  • Part Seven Drainage Systems, Sewage Treatment and Refuse Disposal
  • Part Eight Sanitary Fitments and Appliances: Discharge and Waste Systems
  • Part Nine Gas Installation, Components and Controls
  • Part Ten Electrical Supply and Installations
  • Part Eleven Mechanical Conveyors † Lifts, Escalators and Travelators
  • Part Twelve Fire Prevention and Control Services
  • Part Thirteen Security Installations
  • Part Fourteen Accommodation for Building Services
  • Part Fifteen Alternative and Renewable Energy


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Handbook of Electric Power Calculations

Handbook of Electric Power Calculations

H. Wayne Beaty

Preference :

The Handbook of Electric Power Calculations provides detailed step-by-step calculation
procedures commonly encountered in electrical engineering. The Handbook contains a
wide array of topics and each topic is written by an authority on the subject. The treatment
throughout the Handbook is practical with very little emphasis on theory.
Each of the 20 Sections follows this format:
• Clear statement of the problem.
• Step-by-step calculation procedure.
• Inclusion of suitable graphs and illustrations to clarify the procedure.
• Use of SI and USCS equivalents.

This relatively simple, yet comprehensive format adds greatly to the use of the Handbook
by the engineer or technician. Arithmetic and algebra are employed in the solution
of the majority of the problems. Each section contains a list of references or a bibliography
that is pertinent to the subject matter.

Handbook of Electric Power Calculations


Content :
  • Section 1. Basic Network Analysis
  • Section 2. Instrumentation 
  • Section 3. dc Motors and Generators 
  • Section 4. Transformers 
  • Section 5. Three-Phase Induction Motors 
  • Section 6. Single-Phase Motors 
  • Section 7. Synchronous Machines 
  • Section 8. Generation of Electric Power 
  • Section 9. Overhead Transmission Lines and Underground Cables 
  • Section 10. Electric-Power Networks 
  • Section 11. Load-Flow Analysis in Power Systems 
  • Section 12. Power-Systems Control
  • Section 13. Short-Circuit Computations
  • Section 14. System Grounding
  • Section 15. Power-System Protection
  • Section 16. Power System Stability 
  • Section 17. Cogeneration
  • Section 18. Stationary Batteries
  • Section 19. Electric Energy Economic Methods
  • Section 20. Lighting Design


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Electrical and Electronics Measurements and Instrumentation

Electrical and Electronics Measurements and Instrumentation

Prithwiraj Purkait

Preference :

This book can be used as a textbook for the course in electrical and electronics
measurements and instrumentation. It presents a comprehensive treatment of the subject of
electrical and electronics measurements and instrumentation as taught to the
undergraduate students of B.Tech/BE in Electrical Engineering, Electrical and Electronics
Engineering, Instrumentation Engineering, and allied branches. The book thus aims at
maintaining balance between these diverse fields of engineering disciplines by drawing
examples from various applications. The prerequisite on the part of the reader is that he or
she should have had introductory courses on linear algebra, basic calculus, vector/phasor
analysis, transform theory, circuit analysis and elementary mechanics. For the students’
interest, appendices on number systems and unit conversions are added at the end.

While conceptualising the text, the authors felt that the scope and method of treatment
could, with advantage, be augmented to suit the requirements of various branches of
engineering. Owing to the rapid advancements taking place in modern electrical and allied
industries, and their interconnection with power systems, the subject of electrical and
electronics measurements is gaining an ever-increasing importance.
As a subject of study, electrical measurement is one of the more traditional fields of
electrical and allied engineering disciplines. However, with progress in technology and
manufacturing expertise, measurements of physical parameters have gained new heights in
terms of state-of-the-art concepts and technologies. This book aims at bridging traditional
concepts with modern technologies of electrical and electronics measurements and
instrumentation.


Download Electrical and Electronics Measurements and Instrumentation


Content :
  • Concept of Measurement Systems
  • Analog Meters
  • Instrument Transformers
  • Measurement of Resistance
  • Potentiometers
  • AC Bridges
  • Power Measurement
  • Measurement of Energy
  • Cathode Ray Oscilloscope
  • Electronic Instruments
  • Sensors and Transducers
  • Magnetic Measurements
  • Signal Generators and Analysers
  • Data Acquisition System
  • Recording, Storage and Display Devices
  • Programmable Logic Controllers
  • Microwave and RF Measurement
  • Fibre Optic Measurements


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Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Analysis and Design

Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Analysis and Design

Faye C. McQuiston, Jerald D. Parker, Jeffrey D. Spitler

Preference :

The text is intended for undergraduate and graduate engineering students who
have completed basic courses in thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and
dynamics. It contains sufficient material for two-semester courses with latitude in
course make-up. Although primarily directed toward classroom teaching, it should
also be useful for continuing education and as a reference.
Two physical changes have been made for this edition. First, the charts that were
previously contained in a pocket inside the back cover are now fold-out perforated
pages in Appendix E. Second, the computer programs and examples previously furnished
on a CD-ROM with the text are now available on the Wiley website
(www.wiley.com/college/mcquiston) by using the registration code included with new
copies of this text. If you purchased a copy of the text that does not contain a registration
code, or if you wish to acquire the software independently of the text, you may
purchase access directly from the website.
The load calculation computer program available on the website has been
enhanced and a number of examples have been placed there to broaden coverage in a
number of chapters.
The cooling load calculation procedures of Chapter 8 have been reorganized to
facilitate different approaches to covering the material. At least three approaches
might be used: first, the heat balance method may be covered only as brief background
material, with emphasis then placed on how to use the HVAC Load Explorer program;
second, the heat balance method may be taught rigorously, although this might be
more feasible for a graduate class; third, the radiant time series method (RTSM) may
be taught independently of the heat balance method. In the last case, a spreadsheet is
now provided at the web site that implements the RTSM and should speed utilization
of the method.
Many other revisions have been made to clarify examples and discussion. Various
material has been updated from the latest ASHRAE Handbooks where needed.
It appears that a complete conversion from English (IP) to the international (SI)
system of units will not soon, if ever, occur in the United States. However, engineers
should be comfortable with both systems of units when they enter practice. Therefore,
this text continues to use them both, with emphasis placed on the English system.
Instructors may blend the two systems as they choose.

Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Analysis and Design


Content :
  • Introduction
  • Air-Conditioning Systems
  • Moist Air Properties and Conditioning Processes
  • Comfort and Health—Indoor Environmental Quality
  • Heat Transmission in Building Structures
  • Space Heating Load
  • Solar Radiation
  • The Cooling Load
  • Energy Calculations and Building Simulation
  • Flow, Pumps, and Piping Design
  • Space Air Diffusion
  • Fans and Building Air Distribution
  • Direct Contact Heat and Mass Transfer
  • Extended Surface Heat Exchangers



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Newnes Electrical Engineer’s Handbook

Newnes Electrical Engineer’s Handbook

D.F. Warne

Preference :

There seems to be a trend in the public perception of engineering and technology that to be able to operate a piece of equipment or a system is to understand how it works. Nothing could be further from the truth. The gap between the ability to operate and a genuine understanding is, if anything, widening because much of the complexity added to modem electrical equipment has the specific aim of making it operable or ‘user-friendly’ without special training or knowledge.
The need for a basic explanation of principles, leading to a simple description of how various important and common classes of electrical equipment works, has never been stronger. Perhaps more so than in its predecessor, Newnes Electrical Pucker Book, an attempt is made to address fundamentals in this book, and the reader is encouraged to follow through any areas of interest using the references at the end of each chapter. More comprehensive coverage of all the subjects covered in this pocketbook is available in the Newnes Electrical Engineer’s Reference Book.
More so now than ever before, the specification and performance of electrical equipment is governed by national and international standards. While it would be inappropriate in a pocket book to cover standards in any detail, a summary of key standards is included for reference purposes at the end of each chapter.

The structure of the book is based around three groups of chapters, which address:

  • fundamentals and general material
  • the design and operation of the main classes of electrical equipment
  • special technologies which apply to a range of equipment

The first group comprises three chapters which set out fundamentals and principles running through all aspects of electrical technology. The opening chapter deals with fundamentals of electric and magnetic fields and circuits, with energy and power conversion principles.

Newnes Electrical Engineer’s Handbook


Content :
  • Introduction
  • Principles of electrical engineering
  • Materials For electrical engineering
  • Measurement and instrumentation
  • Generators
  • Transformers
  • Switchgear
  • Fuses and protection days
  • Wires and cables
  • Motors, motor control and drives
  • Static power supplies
  • Batteries and fuel cells
  • Electroheat
  • The power system
  • Electromagnetic compatiblity
  • Hazardous area equipment


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Power System Transients Theory and Applications

Power System Transients Theory and Applications

Naoto Nagaoka, Akihiro AmetAni

Preference :

When lightning strikes a building or a transmission tower, an electric current flows into its structures, which are made of electrically conductive materials such as steel and copper. The electric current produces a high voltage called “overvoltage” (or abnormal voltage), which can damage or break electrical equipment installed in the building or in the power transmission system.
The breakdown may shut down the electrical room of the building, resulting in a blackout of the whole building. If the breakdown occurs in a substation in a high-voltage power transmission system, a city where electricity is supplied by the substation can experience a blackout. An overvoltage can also be generated by switching operations of a circuit breaker or a load switch,
which is electrically the same as a breaker in a house. A phenomenon during the time period in which an overvoltage occurs due to lightning or switching operation is called transient, while electricity
being supplied under normal circumstances is called steady state. In general, a transient dies out and reaches a steady state within approximately 10 μs (10−6 s) in the lightning transient case and within approximately 10 ms (10−3 s) in the switching transient case. Occasionally, a transient sustains for
a few seconds if it involves resonant oscillation of circuit parameters (mostly inductance and capacitance) or mechanical oscillation of the steel shaft of a generator (called subsynchronous resonance).
In order to design the electrical strength of electrical equipment and to ensure human safety during a transient, it is crucial to perform a transient analysis, especially in the field of electric power engineering.



Content :
  • Theory of Distributed-Parameter Circuits and Impedance/Admittance Formulas
  • Transients on Overhead Lines
  • Transients on Cable Systems
  • Transient and Dynamic Characteristics of New Energy Systems
  • Numerical Electromagnetic Analysis Methods and Their Application in Transient Analyses
  • Electromagnetic Disturbances in Power Systems and Customer Homes
  • Grounding
  • Problems and Application Limits of Numerical Simulations


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Manual of engineering drawing, Second edition

Manual of engineering drawing, Second edition

Colin H. Simmons, Dennis E. Maguire

Preference :

The general trend in Engineering Design had been that the designer who was responsible for the conception and design of a particular product generally specified other aspects of the manufacturing process. Gradually however, developments from increased computing power in all aspects of production have resulted in progressive advances in manufacturing techniques, metrology, and quality assurance. The impact of these additional requirements on the Total Design Cycle resulted in the withdrawal of BS 308 in 2000. Its replacement BS 8888 is a far more
comprehensive Standard. It is important to stress that British and ISO drawing standards are not produced for any particular draughting method. No matter how a drawing is produced, either
on an inexpensive drawing board or the latest CAD equipment, the drawing must conform to the same standards and be incapable of misinterpretation.

The text which follows covers the basic aspects of engineering drawing practice required by college and university students, and also professional drawing office personnel. Applications show how regularly used standards should be applied and interpreted. Geometrical constructions are a necessary part of engineering design and analysis and examples of twoand three-dimensional geometry are provided. Practice is invaluable, not only as a means of understanding principles, but in developing the ability to visualize shape and form in three dimensions with a high degree of fluency. It is sometimes forgotten that not only does a draughtsman produce original drawings but is also
required to read and absorb the content of drawings he receives without ambiguity.

The section on engineering diagrams is included to stimulate and broaden technological interest, further study, and be of value to students engaged on project work. Readers are invited to redraw a selection of the examples given for experience, also to appreciate the
necessity for the insertion and meaning of every line. Extra examples with solutions are available in
Engineering Drawing From First Principles using AutoCAD, also published by Butterworth-Heinemann. It is a pleasure to find an increasing number of young ladies joining the staff in drawing offices where they can make an effective and balanced contribution to design decisions. Please accept our apologies for continuing to use the term ‘draughtsmen’, which is the generally understood collective noun for drawing office personnel, but implies equality in status. In conclusion, may we wish all readers every success in their studies and careers. We hope they will obtain much satisfaction from employment in the absorbing activities related to creative design and considerable
pleasure from the construction and presentation of accurately defined engineering drawings.

Download Manual of engineering drawing, Second edition


Content :
  • 1 Drawing office management and organization 
  • 2 Product development and computer-aided design 
  • 3 CAD organization and applications
  • 4 Principles of first and third angle orthographic projection
  • 5 Linework and lettering
  • 6 Three-dimensional illustrations using isometric and oblique projection
  • 7 Drawing layouts and simplified methods
  • 8 Sections and sectional views
  • 9 Geometrical constructions and tangency
  • 10 Loci applications
  • 11 True lengths and auxiliary views
  • 12 Conic sections and interpenetration of solids
  • 13 Development of patterns from sheet materials
  • 14 Dimensioning principles
  • 15 Screw threads and conventional representations
  • 16 Nuts, bolts, screws and washers
  • 17 Keys and keyways
  • 18 Worked examples in machine drawing
  • 19 Limits and fits
  • 20 Geometrical tolerancing and datums
  • 21 Drawing solutions


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