Steel Beam Design Excel Sheet with Gravity Loading

Steel Beam Design Excel Sheet with Gravity Loading



The Steel Beam module does not permit biaxial loading at the present time, so there are two potential approaches to this loading scheme:
One option is to do two separate Steel Beam runs.  One run would apply the gravity loads to the beam with the beam oriented “web vertical”.  The other run would apply the wind loads to the beam with the beam oriented “web horizontal”.  This would require that the user manually combine the results of the two runs using engineering judgment to come up with a final result.



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Reinforced Flat Slab Design Excel Sheet

Reinforced Flat Slab Design Excel Sheet 



Flat slab system is an important division of concrete floor system. A civil engineer must know all the aspects regarding the flat floor system. Here, we have tried to gather various reading materials available in the web about flat slab floor system in one place. These materials are originally located at different websites. A civil engineer should study these lectures and materials for structural engineering acumen.

A flat slab is a reinforced concrete slab supported directly by concrete columns without the

use of beams. The benefits of using flat slab construction are becoming increasingly recognized. Flat slabs without drops (thickened areas of slab around the columns to resist punching shear) can be built faster because formwork is simplified and minimized, and rapid turn-around can be achieved using a combination of early striking2 and flying systems. The overall speed of construction will then be limited by the rate at which vertical elements can be cast. Flat slab construction places no restrictions on the positioning of horizontal services and partitions and can minimize floor-to-floor heights when there is no requirement for a deep false ceiling. This can have knock-on benefits in terms of lower building height, reduced cladding costs and prefabricated services.

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Concrete Pier (Isolated Deep Foundation) Design Based on ACI 318-14

Concrete Pier (Isolated Deep Foundation) Design Based on ACI 318-14 



Foundation elements are most commonly constructed of reinforced concrete. As compared to the design of concrete elements that form the superstructure of a building, additional consideration must be given to concrete foundation elements due to permanent exposure to potentially deleterious materials, less precise construction tolerances and even the possibility of unintentional mixing with soil.
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Wind Analysis for Shade Open Structure Based on ASCE 7-16

Wind Analysis for Shade Open Structure Based on ASCE 7-16



In order for a structure to be sound and secure, the foundation, roof, and walls must be strong and wind-resistant. When building a structure it is important to calculate wind load to ensure that the structure can withstand high winds, especially if the building is located in an area known for inclement weather. The main wind force resisting system of a building is a vital component. While wind load calculations can be difficult to figure out because the wind is unpredictable, some standard calculations can give you a good idea of what a building can withstand. Wind loading analysis is an essential part of the building process. If wind loading analysis is not done correctly the resulting effects could include collapsed windows and doors, ripped off roofing, and more. Contact Buildings Guide for quotes on safe and durable prefabricated steel buildings.



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Fundamental Structural Analysis

Fundamental Structural Analysis 

w. J. Spencer 

Preference :

Significant changes have occurred in the approach to structural analysis over the last twenty years. These changes have been brought about by a more general understanding of the nature of the problem and the development of the digital computer. Almost all s~ructural engineering offices throughout the world would now have access to some form of digital computer, ranging from hand-held programmable calculators through to the largest machines available. Powerful microcomputers are also widely available and many engineers and students have personal computers as a general aid to their work. Problems in structural analysis have now been formulated in such a way that the solution is available through the use of the computer, largely by what is known as matrix methods of structural analysis. It is interesting to note that such methods do not put forward new theories in structural analysis, rather they are a restatement of classical theory in a manner that can be directly related to the computer. This book begins with the premise that most structural analysis will be done on a computer. This is not to say that a fundamental understanding of structural behaviour is not presented or that only computer-based techniques are given. Indeed, the reverse is true. Understanding structural behaviour is an underlying theme and many solution techniques suitable for hand computation, such as moment distribution, are retained. The most widely used method of computer-based structural analysis is the matrix stiffness method. For this reason, all of the fundamental concepts of structures and structural behaviour are presented against the background of the matrix stiffness method. The result is that the student is naturally introduced to the use of the computer in structural analysis, and neither matrix methods nor the computer are treated as an addendum.

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Content :
  • Introduction to Structural Engineering 
  • Equilibrium Analysis and Determinacy of Structures 
  • Basic Concepts of the Stiffness Method 
  • The Matrix Stiffness Method-Part 1: Beams and Rectangular Frames 
  • The Moment Distribution Method 
  • The Matrix Stiffness Method-Part 2: Coordinate Transformation 
  • The Principle of Virtual Work 
  • The Flexibility Method of Analysis 
  • The Approximate Analysis of Structures
  • Application of Computer Programs to Structural Analysis


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Water Retaining Structures Analysis and Design

Water Retaining Structures Analysis and Design



Estimating labour requirements is one of the most important parts of estimating and costing the cost of labour. It is often more than half the cost of a job. An error in this area can be very costly to the workplace.
Labour costs depend on the time it will take to manufacture an item. To work this out, it helps to break the job down into the different steps required and then estimate the time it would take someone to complete each step.



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HYDRAULICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

HYDRAULICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Andrew Chadwick, John Morfett

Preference :

The aim of the fifth edition of Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering remains to be
to provide comprehensive coverage of civil engineering hydraulics in all its aspects and to provide
an introduction to the principles of environmentally sound hydraulic engineering practice.
To those who would be reading this book for the first time, we hope you enjoy it. You should
find sufficient material to cover most first degree courses and useful information for a higher
degree and for professional practice. The references and further reading lists are comprehensive
and point the way to further study.
The fifth edition has been extensively reviewed by a panel of ten experts drawn from across
the world. It contains much of the material from the previous editions and includes substantive
revisions of the chapters on hydraulic machines, flood hydrology and computational modeling.
New material has also been added to the chapters on hydrostatics, principles of fluid flow, the behavior of real fluids, open channel flow, pressure surge in pipelines, wave theory, sediment
transport, river engineering, and coastal engineering. The latest recommendations regarding
climate change predictions, impacts and adaptation measures have also been included. The
chapter on water quality modeling has been removed to contain the size of the book. References
have been updated throughout.

Hydraulics is a very ancient science. The Egyptians and Babylonians constructed canals, both
for irrigation and for defensive purposes. No attempts were made at that time to understand
the laws of fluid motion. The first notable attempts to rationalize the nature of pressure and
flow patterns were undertaken by the Greeks. The laws of hydrostatics and buoyancy were
enunciated; Ctesibius and Hero designed hydraulic equipment such as the piston pump and
water clock and, of course, there was the Archimedes screw pump. The Romans appear, like the
Egyptians, to have been more interested in the practical and constructional aspects of hydraulics
than in theorizing. Thus, development continued slowly until the time of the Renaissance,
when men such as Leonardo Da Vinci began to publish the results of their observations. Ideas
which emerged then, respecting conservation of mass (continuity of flow), frictional resistance
and the velocity of surface waves, are still in use, though sometimes in a more refined form.
The Italian School became famous for their work. Torricelli et al. observed the behavior of
water jets. They compared the path traced by a free jet with projectile theory and related the
jet velocity to the square root of the pressure generating the flow. Guglielmini et al. published
the results of observations on river flows. The Italians were hydraulicians in the original sense
of the word, i.e., they were primarily empiricists. Up to this point, mathematics had played
no significant part in this sort of scientific work. Indeed, at that time mathematics was largely
confined to the principles of geometry, but this was about to change.



Content :
  • 1 Hydrostatics
  • 2 Principles of Fluid Flow
  • 3 Behaviour of Real Fluids
  • 4 Flow in Pipes and Closed Conduits
  • 5 Open Channel Flow
  • 6 Pressure Surge in Pipelines
  • 7 Hydraulic Machines
  • 12 Pipeline Systems
  • 13 Hydraulic Structures
  • 14 Computational Hydraulics
  • 15 River and Canal Engineering
  • 16 Coastal Engineering
  • 17 Postscript


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Life Cycle Costing for the Analysis, Management and Maintenance of Civil Engineering Infrastructure

Life Cycle Costing for the Analysis, Management and Maintenance of Civil Engineering Infrastructure

John W. Bull

Preference :

A number of studies have considered life-cycle environmental impacts from the
housing sector (e.g. Adalberth, 1997; Adalberth et al., 2001; Peuportier, 2001; Asif
et al., 2007; Hacker et al., 2008; Hammond and Jones, 2008; Bribián et al., 2009; Oritz
et al, 2009; Mohan and Powell, 2010; Cuéllar-Franca and Azapagic, 2012) but the
life cycle costs have seldom been addressed. And yet, economic aspects such as
housing costs and affordability are important for the sustainable development of the
residential construction sector.
The housing sector is very important for the UK economy as it directly affects
the economic growth (HC, 2008). For example, in 2010, the construction industry
contributed 8.5% of the UK’s total gross domestic product (GDP) of £1.45 trillion,
to which the residential sector contributed 40% (UKCG, 2009). After Denmark and
Greece, the UK has the highest housing prices across the European Union with people
spending around 40% of their income on housing costs such as mortgage payments
and energy bills (Eurostat, 2012). The latter is the cause of fuel poverty of around six
million households owing to the rising energy prices (DECC, 2009; Bolton, 2010).
In recent years, many people have been unable to purchase a home because of
changes in the availability and types of financial and mortgage products (Sergeant,
2011; DCLG, 2012; RICS, 2012). This situation has created an unstable housing market,
which has led to a fall in house prices and dragged the UK economy further
into recession. For example, the average house price of around £190,000 in 2008 fell
to £160,000 in 2011 (HPUK, 2012). Home ownership is also declining and in 2011
it dropped to 66% from 70.9% in 2003; so the proportion of households that own
their own homes has fallen back to where it was in 1989 (BBC, 2012). This trend
is expected to continue over the next 10 years (Sergeant, 2011). Such a situation is
affecting particularly young people – only 10% of all owner-occupiers are under 35
years of age (BBC, 2012) while 33% of first-time buyers are over 35



Content :
  • Life cycle cost analysis of the UK housing stock
  • Case study: Life cycle analysis of a community hydroelectric power system
  • Selection indicators for stabilization of pavement systems
  • Pavement type selection for highway rehabilitation based on a life-cycle cost analysis
  • Life cycle management framework for highway bridges
  • Life cycle analysis of highway composite bridges
  • Life cycle cost analysis for corrosion protective coatings


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Introduction to Civil Engineering Systems

Introduction to Civil Engineering Systems

Samuel Labi

Preference :

The civil engineering discipline involves the development of structural, hydraulic, geotechnical,
construction, environmental, transportation, architectural, and other civil systems that address societies’
infrastructure needs. The planning and design of these systems are well covered in traditional
courses and texts at most universities. In recent years, however, universities have increasingly
sought to infuse a “systems” perspective to their traditional civil engineering curricula. This development
arose out of the recognition that the developers of civil engineering systems need a solid set
of skills in other disciplines. These skills are needed to equip them further for their traditional tasks
at the design and construction phases and also to burnish their analytical skills for other less-obvious
or emerging tasks at all phases of system development.
The development of civil engineering systems over the centuries and millennia has been characterized
by continual improvements that were achieved mostly through series of trial-and-error as
systems were constructed and reconstructed by learning from past mistakes. At the current time,
the use of trial-and-error methods on real-life systems is infeasible because it may take not only
several decades but also involve excessive costs in resources and, possibly, human lives before the
best system can be finally realized. Also in the past, systems have been developed in ways that were
not always effective or cost-effective. For these and other reasons, the current era, which has inherited
the civil engineering systems built decades ago, poses a unique set of challenges for today’s
civil engineers. A large number of these systems, dams, bridges, roads, ports, and so on are functionally
obsolescent or are approaching the end of their design lives and are in need of expansion,
rehabilitation, or replacement. The issue of inadequate or aging civil infrastructure has deservedly
gained national attention due to a series of publicized engineering system failures in the United
States, such as the New Orleans levees, the Minnesota and Seattle interstate highway bridges, and
the New York and Dallas sewers, and in other countries. The current problem of aging infrastructure
is further exacerbated by increased demand and loading fueled by population growth, rising
user expectations of system performance, increased desire for stakeholder participation in decisionmaking
processes, terrorism threats, the looming specter of tort liability, and above all, inadequate
funding for sustained preservation and renewal of these systems.



Content :
  • Introduction
  • Fundamental Concepts in Systems Engineering
  • Tools Needed to Carry Out the Tasks
  • The Needs Assessment Phase
  • Systems Planning
  • System Design
  • Systems Construction
  • System Operations
  • System Monitoring
  • System Preservation (Maintenance and Rehabilitation
  • System End of Life
  • Other Topics Related to Civil Systems Development


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Fluid Mechanics for Civil and Environmental Engineers

Fluid Mechanics for Civil and Environmental Engineers

Ahlam I. Shalaby

Preference :

The study of fluid mechanics is important in numerous fields of engineering, including civil,
environmental, agricultural, irrigation, mechanical, aerospace, nuclear, chemical, petroleum,
biomedical, fire protection, and automotive engineering. The fundamental principles
of fluid mechanics include three basic units of study: fluid statics, fluid kinematics, and fluid
dynamics (Section 1.2). The physical properties/characteristics of a fluid system, along with
the fluid kinematics and fluid dynamics, will determine the type of fluid flow (Section 1.3).
The physical quantities of fluid flow (geometrics, kinematics, and dynamics) and the physical
properties/characteristics of fluids (mass density, specific gravity, specific weight, viscosity,
surface tension, vapor pressure, and bulk modulus) are expressed using four
primary dimensions (force or mass, length, time, and temperature) and a specific system
of units (metric or English) (Section 1.4). Most fluid properties vary with temperature and
pressure, while the acceleration due to gravity varies with altitude and thus atmospheric
pressure. As such, it is important to distinguish between two types of pressure scales
(Section 1.5), define the conditions of standard atmosphere (Section 1.6), and define the standard
reference for standard atmospheric pressure (Section 1.7). Furthermore, it is important
to highlight Newton’s second law of motion in the definition of the acceleration due to gravity
(Section 1.8) and to note that the dynamic forces acting on a fluid element include those
due to gravity, pressure, viscosity, elasticity, surface tension, and inertia (Section 1.9). And,
finally, the physical properties of fluids are presented in Section 1.10.

The fundamental principles of fluid mechanics can be subdivided into three units of study:
fluid statics, fluid kinematics, and fluid dynamics. Fluid statics deals with fluids at rest,
while fluid kinematics and fluid dynamics deal with fluids in motion. Fluid statics is based
upon the principles of hydrostatics, which yield the hydrostatic pressure equation. Fluid
kinematics is based upon the principle of conservation of mass, which yields the continuity
equation. And fluid dynamics is based upon the principle of conservation of momentum
(Newton’s second law of motion), which yields the equations of motion, known as the
energy equation and the momentum equation. The energy equation may alternatively be
based on the principle of conservation of energy (the first law of thermodynamics). Furthermore,
fluid dynamics also includes the topic of dimensional analysis, which yields the resistance equations.



Content :
  • Introduction
  • Fluid Statics
  • Continuity Equation
  • Energy Equation
  • Momentum Equation
  • Flow Resistance Equations
  • Dimensional Analysis
  • Pipe Flow
  • External Flow
  • Dynamic Similitude and Modeling


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Fundamentals of Construction Estimating

Fundamentals of Construction Estimating

Smid Book

Preference :

The goal of this book is to present a method of compiling consistently accurate
construction cost estimates in a minimum of time. The method can easily be
integrated with the latest technology available to obtain soaring productivity; it is a
method of estimating that offers extensive review and control capabilities because it
is consistent with the basic procedures followed by professional estimators and
quantity surveyors in the construction industry.
The method presented is intended to represent a standard or basic core that can
be adopted in the many types of construction estimating used across the wide variety
of construction work. Worked examples and explanations that are offered, however,
will come from small building projects of minimal complexity so that the reader can
concentrate on the technique involved rather than spend time unraveling detail.
The book is intended primarily for the person who is beginning to learn the
process of construction cost estimating. This person may be employed in a contractor’s
office taking on estimating responsibilities for the first time, or he or she may
be a student starting a course in estimating at college. The text will also be of interest to many supervisors, construction managers, and practicing estimators who, from
time to time, may need to refer to an estimating standard or simply investigate how
other estimators approach this subject.

Estimates serve a number of different functions in the construction process. In the early stages of a construction program, the owner needs an
estimate of the probable cost of construction to assess the financial feasibility of the
project. This conceptual estimate has to be prepared from a minimum amount of
information because it is required at a time when the project is often little more than
a vague idea in the mind of the owner. There will be few if any design details at this
stage because the design process will not begin until the owner is satisfied that the
cost of proceeding with it is justified.



Content :
  • INTRODUCTION
  • THE ESTIMATING PROCESS AND PRELIMINARY PROCEDURES
  • MEASURING QUANTITIES GENERALLY
  • MEASURING SITEWORK, EXCAVATION, AND PILING
  • MEASURING CONCRETE WORK
  • MEASURING MASONRY WORK
  • MEASURING CARPENTRY AND MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
  • PRICING GENERALLY
  • PRICING CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
  • PRICING EXCAVATION AND BACKFILL
  • PRICING CONCRETE WORK
  • PRICING MASONRY, CARPENTRY, AND FINISHES WORK
  • PRICING SUBCONTRACTORS’ WORK
  • PRICING GENERAL EXPENSES
  • CLOSING THE BID
  • LIFE-CYCLE COSTING


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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

CHRISTOPHER GORSE

Preference :

This Dictionary aims to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date reference of construction, surveying, and civil engineering terms within one publication. The entries address the needs of those studying on built environment courses or engaged in professional practice as well as providing much useful information for those with a general interest in architecture or construction. Builders, trade suppliers, and contractors will find the dictionary a useful desktop manual that can be easily and quickly used to check unfamiliar terminology. Due to the size and nature of the industry, it is difficult for even the most knowledgeable professionals to stay abreast of emerging issues and retain an encyclopedia of construction terms at the front of their mind. In such cases, the book acts as a reminder, giving reassurance of meanings and confidence in communication. Built environment professionals, including architects, building surveyors, building services engineers, construction managers, civil engineers, electrical engineers, facilities managers, mechanical engineers, and quantity surveyors should find the Dictionary useful. It offers a quick and easy guide to terms and information that underpin the environment in which we live, both built and natural. In covering these terms, the authors have delved into the areas of building physics and science, and their application to design, structures, materials, and practices that inform construction and engineering. Issues associated with geology, geography, climate, and the natural environment within which buildings and structures are accommodated are also covered. The policy and legal frameworks that provide governance and procedure to the built environment are included, as well as the issues related to the professional organizations that hold influential positions within the industry.



The importance of the sustainability agenda and the related fields of building,
engineering, and surveying mean that more people are taking an interest in
construction and need to familiarize themselves quickly with the language and
terminology used. The dictionary offers a good point of reference for those
operating within the field and those just interested in learning more about the
built environment and engineering. As a major consumer of the world’s natural
resources, the built environment and the impact that it has on the environment
is high on the government agenda, with all policy makers ensuring that it is
given due consideration. It is expected that the book, terms, and references will
continue to grow and be in greater demand as the degree of importance associated

with the built environment increases.


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Civil Engineer’s Handbook of Professional Practice

Civil Engineer’s Handbook of Professional Practice

Karen Lee Hansen, Kent E. Zenobia

Preference :

The Civil Engineer’s Handbook of Professional Practice is a professional practice guide
for civil engineers. The first decade of the 21st century has afforded many opportunities
to reflect on the role civil engineers will play in coming years. The global economy
and world banking system, national security, climate change, dwindling natural
resources, technological advances, and societal changes have provided sufficient food
for thought. In retrospect, the 2001 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
report, titled Engineering the Future of Civil Engineering, which acknowledged that
civil engineering must respond proactively to increasingly complex challenges related
to public health, safety, and welfare, appears prophetic.
As a university program, civil engineering has been growing in the 21st century.
Enrollment in most universities across the nation continues to increase, partially due
to shrinking opportunities in other technical fields as a result of outsourcing. Civil
engineers work very closely with government agencies and on projects requiring significant
local knowledge, making outsourcing of their work difficult. According to
the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:
Civil engineers are expected to experience 24 percent employment growth during
the projections decade [2008 2018], faster than the average for all occupations.
Spurred by general population growth and the related need to improve the Nation’s
infrastructure, more civil engineers will be needed to design and construct or expand
transportation, water supply, and pollution control systems and buildings and
building complexes. They also will be needed to repair or replace existing roads,
bridges, and other public structures.
For several years the country’s infrastructure has been given a grade of ‘‘D’’ on
the ASCE’s infrastructure report card; in 2009 the ASCE estimated that a $2.2 trillion
investment was needed over the next five years to rectify this problem. Significant
public and private funding sources have been established to address this challenge
and, as a result, the demand for well-educated and competent civil engineers should
continue.



Content :
  • Introduction
  • Background and History of the Profession
  • Ethics
  • Professional Engagement
  • The Engineer's Role in Project Development
  • What Engineers Deliver
  • Executing a Professional Commission—Project Management
  • Permitting
  • The Client Relationship and Business Development
  • Leadership
  • Legal Aspects of Professional Practice
  • Managing the Civil Engineering Enterprise


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Principles Of Structural Stability Theory

Principles Of Structural Stability Theory

ALEXANDER CHAJES

Preference :

This is an introductory book on the subject of structural stability. Its aim is to provide a detailed treatment of the buckling characteristics of various structural elements and to present the different analytical methods used in the solution of stability problems. The first chapter deals with the buckling of columns. It begins with the Linear elastic theory and goes on to treat initial imperfections, large deformations, and inelastic behavior. The chapter concludes by relating theoretical results to actual engineering materials. In Chapter 2 various approximate methods used to solve buckling problems are considered. Numerical techniques that can be used in conjunction with high-speed electronic computers, as well as traditional methods, are included. The remaining chapters deal with the buckling of beams, frames, plates, and shells. These chapters serve a dual purpose. They present the buckling characteristics of various structural elements in a manner similar to the treatment of columns in Chapter l.

 They also demonstrate how the various approximate methods introduced in Chapter 2 can be applied to different structural systems. Although the book is primarily concerned with the analysis, an attempt is made to relate theoretical conclusions to current design practices. An effort has been made to limit the book to fundamentals and to treat these in considerable detail. Therefore, it is felt that the text can easily be followed by persons not already familiar with the subject of structural stability, including both upper-level undergraduate or graduate students and practicing structural engineers. If the book is used as a textbook, it will be evident that most chapters contain more examples of applications of the theory that can be covered in class. It may be desirable to assign some of these examples, in addition to the problems at the ends of the chapters, as home assignments by the students. The basis of the book is a course on the buckling of structures, taught by Dr. George Winter at Cornell University, which the author was privileged to take when he studied under Dr. Winter. The author wishes to express his appreciation and gratitude to Dr. Winter for inspiring him to write the book and for the help given by Dr. Winter in preparing the book. Acknowledgment is made also to Dr. Robert Archer and other colleagues and students at the University of Massachusetts for their help and useful suggestions and to Dr. Merit P. White for providing the kind of atmosphere conducive to scholarly work.



Content :
  • BUCKLlNG OF COLUMNS
  • APPROXIMATE METHODS OF ANALYSIS
  • BEAM COLUMNS
  • BUCKLlNG OF FRAMES
  • TORSIONAL BUCKLlNG
  • BUCKLlNG OF PLATES
  • BUCKLlNG OFAXIAllV COMPRESSED CVLlNDRICAl SHEllS


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Fundamentals of Civil Engineering An introduction to the ASCE body of knowledge

Fundamentals of Civil Engineering An introduction to the ASCE body of knowledge

Richard H. McCuen, Edna Z. Ezzell

Preference :

The second edition of the ASCE Body of Knowledge (BOK) states: For purposes of the civil engineering BOK, outcomes are statements that describe what individuals are expected to know and be able to do by the time of entry into the practice of Civil Engineering at the professional level in the 21st century—that is, attain licensure. Outcomes define the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that individuals acquire through appropriate formal education and prelicensure experience.1 It is quite likely that most civil engineering programs as they are currently structured do not fully meet this goal. The technical side of the BOK is probably addressed adequately, likely even more than adequately. However, all students who receive undergraduate degrees in civil engineering probably fail to adequately develop the full range of knowledge, attitudes, and skills suggested and implied by the BOK. Undergraduate civil engineering education would be greatly enhanced if the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) stressed in the BOK were more formally addressed in the curriculum.

This objective will be more easily accomplished if resource material is available. This primer was written as a resource for addressing some of the KSAs that are not specifically introduced in many undergraduate civil engineering programs. This primer was developed principally as a reference for an undergraduate course where topics identified in the ASCE Body of Knowledge are presented. The material covered in this primer is limited to the nontechnical aspects of civil engineering. The material presented in the book for each BOK outcome is intended as an introduction rather than thorough coverage, as an entire three-credit-hour course could be devoted to the individual BOK outcomes like leadership and communication. In addition to civil engineering students, the primer could serve as a resource for those in other engineering disciplines, as many of the BOK outcomes are relevant to success in those fields. While the primer was conceived as a classroom resource, it would certainly be of value to those who have completed their formal education but have an interest in adding breadth to their technical knowledge.



Content :
  • Introduction
  • Humanities
  • Social Sciences
  • Experimentation
  • Sustainability
  • Contemporary Issues and Historical Perspectives
  • Risk and Uncertainty
  • Communication
  • Public Policy
  • Globalization
  • Leadership
  • Teamwork
  • Professional and Ethical Responsibilities


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Materials for Civil and Construction Engineers, Fourth Edition

Materials for Civil and Construction Engineers, Fourth Edition

Michael S. Mamlouk

Preference :

A basic function of civil and construction engineering is to provide and maintain the infrastructure needs of society. The infrastructure includes buildings, water treatment and distribution systems, waste water removal and processing, dams, and highway and airport bridges and pavements. Although some civil and construction engineers are involved in the planning process, most are concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of facilities. The common denominator among these responsibilities is the need to understand the behavior and performance of materials. Although not all civil and construction engineers need to be material specialists, a basic understanding of the material selection process, and the behavior of materials, is a fundamental requirement for all civil and construction engineers performing design, construction, and maintenance.
 Material requirements in civil engineering and construction facilities are different from material requirements in other engineering disciplines. Frequently, civil engineering structures require tons of materials with relatively low replications of specific designs. Generally, the materials used in civil engineering have relatively low unit costs. In many cases, civil engineering structures are formed or fabricated in the field under adverse conditions. Finally, many civil engineering structures are directly exposed to detrimental effects of the environment. The subject of engineering materials has advanced greatly in the past few decades. As a result, many of the conventional materials have either been replaced by more efficient materials or modified to improve their performance. Civil and construction engineers have to be aware of these advances and be able to select the most cost-effective material or use the appropriate modifier for the specific application at hand.
 This text is organized into three parts: (1) introduction to materials engineering, (2) characteristics of materials used in civil and construction engineering, and (3) laboratory methods for the evaluation of materials. The introduction to materials engineering includes information on the basic mechanistic properties of materials, environmental influences, and basic material classes. In addition, one of the responsibilities of civil and construction engineers is the inspection and quality control of materials in the construction process. This requires an understanding of material variability and testing procedures. The atomic structure of materials is covered in order to provide basic understanding of material behavior and to relate the molecular structure to the engineering response.



Content :
  • Materials Engineering Concepts
  • Nature of Materials
  • Steel
  • Aluminum
  • Aggregates
  • Portland Cement, Mixing Water, and Admixtures
  • Portland Cement Concrete
  • Masonry
  • Asphalt Binders and Asphalt Mixtures
  • Wood
  • Composites


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Water Treatment Plant Design

Water Treatment Plant Design

Edward E, Baruth

Preference :

Design of water treatment plants is evolving. New technologies and unit processes continue
to emerge and have become much more common since publication of the third edition
of Water Treatment Plant Design 7 years ago. Security issues, summarized in a new
chapter in this fourth edition, have forever redirected many aspects of design. Additional
reference materials for security design considerations are becoming available and should
be consulted for further information.

Equipment design continues to broaden, yet sources of manufactured products have
become more consolidated in the past 7 years. This new edition contains numerous revisions
of illustrations and photography; however, not all new technologies or equipment
offerings are represented. The American Water Works Association (AWWA) and the
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) are interested in obtaining input from readers
on how to facilitate the future exchange of information on equipment. Alternatives
such as Web-based links are being considered to better provide needed product information
to the design community.

The first version of Water Treatment Plant Design was published in 1939 as a manual
of engineering practice for the ASCE. In 1969, the manual assumed book form and
was updated to include a discussion of developments in pretreatment and filtration processes.
The 1969 edition was the result of a joint effort between committees of the ASCE,
the AWWA, and the Conference of State Sanitary Engineers (CSSE).
The second edition was produced in 1990 through a joint effort of the AWWA and
the ASCE. The material for each chapter was prepared by one or more authors and reviewed
by a joint committee of AWWA and ASCE members.
The third edition, published in 1998, was a joint AWWA and ASCE effort and was
essentially a complete rewrite of the previous edition. The information presented in the
book was prepared as a guide and represented a consensus of opinion of recognized authorities
in the field. A steering committee made up of members from both associations
guided the revision process.

Updates to this fourth edition provide significant new information on many important
topics. Authors from engineering firms and water utilities throughout North America have
revised the chapters and written the two new chapters on UV technologies and security.
Providing support to the chapter authors was a significant base of volunteer reviewers.
Due to the ability of the authors to distribute drafts of their chapters electronically to large
numbers of prospective reviewers, it became apparent that the attempt to accurately name
all reviewers would result in inadvertent omissions. Therefore a general acknowledgment
and thanks to all reviewers is hereby offered.



Content :
  • The Challenge of Water Treatment Plant Design
  • Master Planning and Treatment Process Selection
  • Design and Construction
  • Intake Facilities
  • Aeration and Air Stripping
  • Mixing, Coagulation, and Flocculation
  • Clarification
  • High-Rate Granular Media Filtration
  • Slow Sand and Diatomaceous Earth Filtration
  • Oxidation and Disinfection
  • Water Treatment Plant Security
  • Properties and Characteristics of Water Treatment


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Drawing Management with AutoCAD Sheet Set

Drawing Management with AutoCAD Sheet Set

Prakoso, Edwin

Preference :

Sheet Set is a great tool to manage your project’s documentation. You can collect and manage all of your drawings to a Sheet Set. This will let you and your team access it easily during the design process. Sheet set also allows you to share common information to all drawings in Sheet Set. It allows you automate tasks, related to project’s documentation. For example, you only need to change project name once. The text in all drawings in the same Sheet Set will change automatically. These capabilities will help you to manage your drawings document easily. This e-book will guide you to create your own Sheet Set and utilize it. You will learn how to create your own sheet template, set up Sheet Set, create sheets and use tools in Sheet Set Manager to make you more productive.

You need to know AutoCAD basic features before using this e-book.
The skills that you need to know are:
1. You need to know how to work with AutoCAD dynamic blocks.
2. You need to know how to create and use block attributes.
3. You need to know how to work with layout and viewport
4. You need to know how to work with text fields.
You will use them in this e-book, but they are not covered in details here.



Content :
  • Introduction to Sheet Set
  • Preparation
  • Configuring Sheet Set
  • Working with Sheet Set
  • Working With Sheet Views
  • Sheet Set Automation


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